5 Tips For Landing An Internship

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Often times, getting your first big job out of college requires some kind of prior experience. This can be difficult to get as you have been in college the last four years dedicating your time to learning about the thing you want to do for the rest of your life. One good way to overcome this experience barrier is through getting into an internship for your desired place of work; however, internships can be extremely competitive. This time of year is when more and more people are preparing to apply for internships. Here are 5 tips to get ready for the internship that is best for you.

  1. Build a Resume: Having a well-structured resume is crucial to applying for an internship. Keeping your information clear, concise, and to the point is extremely important. The Vocatio Center on campus is excellent at helping create the perfect resume for you.
  2. Create a Cover Letter: Creating a letter specifically to describe why you are the best person for a specific job will give you a huge competitive edge over the other candidates. This one is often underutilized. Most people I have personally talked to have never created a cover letter in their life. Again, the Vocatio Center can help you create the best possible cover letter.
  3. Do Your Research: Make sure you know a lot about the places you are applying to. Does the company seem like a place you would want to spend 40 hours a week? Do past employees enjoy the work environment? If the internship is paid, what kind of pay has this company offered in the past? Knowing the answers to these questions can help you make the decision that is best for you!
  4. Apply to Multiple Places: Just like for college, it is a good idea to apply for a lot of different places. There is a chance you will not get your number one choice, so it is a good idea to apply for multiple places, just to be sure.
  5. Be Fully Prepared for the Interview: Once you get asked to come in for an interview, be sure you are completely ready. Have talking points prepared for any possible question they might throw at you. Don’t be afraid to talk yourself up! Being humble is good, just not always in an interview setting. Be sure to know a lot about the company, and be sure to explain how you can improve what they are doing there. Mock interviews to practice for the real thing are also offered at the Vocatio Center!

 

*written by Donny Turner

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Matthew’s Monday Movie: “The 13th Warrior”

It’s a new year and a great time to review some odd gems of cinema history. In my ongoing review of films that catch my attention and critical acclaim, I hope to shine the spotlight on films that have taken on a cult status.  Although today’s film was not financially successful nor did it achieve fame from a wider audience, it is often taken for granted among the adventure genre of films.

First a bit of background on this film: the 13th Warrior was released in 1999 and it was adapted from a book by the famous Michael Crichton entitled Eaters of the Dead.  Michael Crichton is more widely known for his novel Jurassic Park. During the mid to late 90’s Crichton’s novels were being adapted to film as fast as possible hoping for another big hit like Jurassic Park. Thus enters director John McTeiran, who’s best known for directing action hits like Predator and Die Hard. Although this film seemed like it would be a great success, it ended up coming in way over budget and flopped with audiences at the box office with estimates at a $120-million-dollar loss.

Now I hope to make the case that this film is not nearly as bad as it is made out to be. While it does have some obvious shortcomings, I still think this film shines in its narrative and set design, and the actors really try to give it their all in spite of the problems associated with the filming and production disputes. I think modern audiences can appreciate an adventure piece set in the dark ages due to a renaissance in the popularity of Norse Viking culture and current trends in video games such as the like of Skyrim.

Plot Synopsis

This film’s story begins with our main protagonist, Ahmad ibn Fadlan, played by Antonio Banderas. Ahamd ibn Fadlan is based in part of a real historical figure who would go on to write and describe his time spent as an ambassador to the Volga Vikings. In this adaptation Ahamd ibn Fadlan is forced to travel with 12 Vikings on a sacred mission of honor back to the far north of their homeland because an ancient enemy has returned and is terrorizing a Norse Kingdom. We are introduced to the leader and King of the Viking warriors: Buliwyf, played by Vladimir Kulich.  Buliwyf encompasses all the traits one would expect to find in a Viking, boasting a tall, silent, stoic appearance that can turn in an instant into ferocious fighter steeped in knowledge of Norse religion. His character is loosely based in homage to that of the mythical Beowulf.   The last character that stands out amongst the rest is that of Herger played by the Norwegian actor Dennis Storhøi. Herger’s character has the closest relationship to Ahamd and the two develop a quick friendship. Herger helps to explain the different culture the Vikings possess while being a friendlier and comedic character in stark contrast to the rest of the Vikings.

In summary, the 13th Warrior was a swing and a miss with mainstream audiences and to many it feels like an unfinished film due to some pacing issues. I wouldn’t go as far as some do and rule it out as a bad film, and I wouldn’t suggest it’s a B film either as the tone remains serious throughout and isn’t that campy. I think what’s most important is that I grew up with the film when there weren’t many choices in the genre as the Viking craze was still years off and this film has a very good period piece feel to it. So why not give this film a try- if it’s not the best, it’s at least entertaining!

This film is available at the Union University Library the Logos.

* Please note The 13th Warrior is rated R for violence throughout and some minor language.

**written by Matthew Beyer

 

 

 

Spotlight on Informe Académico

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Informe Académico is a Spanish language database provided by Gale resources. Its Latino magazines cover business, health, technology, culture, current affairs, and other subjects. If you do better research in Spanish, or if you are trying to practice your Spanish reading comprehension, this database will be helpful for you.

Like the other Gale databases, Informe Académico lists trending searches (búsquedas principales) on its front page. For example, the current most popular topics are Cambio climático, Desarrollo económico, México democracia, Narcotráfico, and Revolución Cubana.

Informe Académico has over 9 million articles and counting. When you need the latest news in Spanish, this database is a great place to look. Simply locate Informe Académico under the library’s “Databases, E-books, and Media” tab and click on it to access this important resource.

Featured eBook: “I Wasn’t Strong Like This When I Started Out: True Stories Of Becoming A Nurse”

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I Wasn’t Strong Like This When I Started Out is a collection of vibrant, funny, honest narrative essays by nurses working in vastly different settings – everything from a cancer ward to a Mercy Ship off the coast of Africa to an Israeli mental hospital.

As editor Lee Gutkind explains in the introduction, “Every essay tells a different story, but all of the essays have a common theme: no matter how difficult nurses’ lives or how secret their suffering, becoming a nurse entails movement into another dimension of strength and character and persistence; it is a path of irreplaceable and often unacknowledged service to society and humanity.”

“Becoming a nurse…is a path of irreplaceable and often unacknowledged service to society and humanity.”

Both sobering and inspirational, this eBook provides a collection of stories that will appeal not only to nursing students but to anyone who loves a good human interest story.

You can access our eBooks collection by searching our regular catalog on the website or going to Databases, E-books, and Media in the Quick Links section of the site.

Top 5 Music Databases

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Did you know that you can stream music online, for free, via the library? We have access to various music databases and their resources. Listed below are 5 of the best music databases that you can use here at Union.

 

Naxos Music Library

The Naxos Music Library is the world’s largest online classical music library. Currently, it offers streaming access to more than 46,000 CDs with more than 653,000 tracks, standard and rare repertoire. It also includes classical, jazz, classic pop, rock, and world music labels with more labels joining every month.

 

Fine Arts and Music Collection (Gale)

With more than 150 full-text magazines and journals covered in databases such as the Wilson Art Index and RILM, this collection will provide support for research in areas such as drama, music, art history, and filmmaking.

 

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New Mozart Edition

This project of the Internationale Stiftung Mozarteum and The Packard Humanities Institute provides access to digital editions of Mozart’s works for personal study and educational use. PDF files of the works are available under the “Table of Contents” link.

 

Oxford Music Online

Includes the Oxford Dictionary of Music, Grove Music Online, and the Oxford Companion to Music. Search more than 50,000 signed articles and 30,000 biographies contributed by over 6,000 scholars from around the world, Grove Music Online is the unsurpassed authority on all aspects of music.

 

RLM Abstracts of Music Literature

RILM, a comprehensive, ongoing guide to publications on music from all over the world, is an indispensable tool for scholars, students, librarians, performers, teachers, and music lovers. RILM includes over 620,000 records; over 30,000 new records are added every year, covering all document types: articles, books, bibliographies, catalogues, dissertations, Festschriften, iconographies, critical commentaries to complete works, ethnographic recordings, conference proceedings, electronic resources, reviews, and more.

 

Donny’s Deductions: Super Smash Bros. & The Gender Barrier

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The library has books and resources on video games, too! Read Donny’s essay on what he’s learned about gender in the gaming community, and check out our eBooks on related subjects.

In competitive video gaming, there tends to be a gap between male and female competitors. In any professional team, one rarely sees a woman playing on a team or making it to the top of tournaments. This is quite surprising because women are scientifically better at quick decision making and hand-eye coordination. They should be represented better; however, the putting down of female gamers has caused women to feel unwelcome in most gaming communities. Hopefully, this is changing.

Super Smash Brothers, a two decade long fighting gaming series that has come out with 4 distinct titles (and a 5th coming out December 7th, 2018) focuses on popular characters fighting each other and has amassed a considerable following in the competitive scene. Smash Bros. Melee, the second game in the series, has the most dedicated followers, but the most recent one has brought in the most new players. For years, the Smash Bros. community faced similar problems that other gaming communities faced: segregation among genders. Often times, women would be looked down upon at tournaments or even made fun of simply because of their gender. More often than not, this dissuaded female competitors to participate in tournaments; they felt uncomfortable and harassed. Thankfully, this has been noticed recently and is being worked on.

The leaders in the competitive scene of Smash Brothers have worked hard to make sure everyone feels welcome. Some tournament organizers helped form Smash Sisters, a side event at tournaments specifically for women. This isn’t ideal, as the best situation would be for female players to just compete in the same tournaments as the male ones, but it is a stepping stone to getting to the right place, and many female competitors have noted that this has helped them feel more involved and accepted. The trend to fight sexism has also popped up greatly online.

On websites like Reddit and SmashBoards (a forum website dedicated to the competitive Smash Bros scene), many have started real discussion about how there must be more equality. In the most recent iteration of the game, there are many female characters. When deciding which characters are the best in the game, there has been no gender stereotypes. Female characters are placed just as high (or low) as other characters. The only determinant on the best characters is through merit, and their gender is not a factor. When character specific discussions have popped up, female character’s appearance is talked about more than the male characters. Thankfully, this discussion is focused primarily on the characters, and the sexualization of the female cast has dropped significantly over the last few years. If anyone starts to comment on the body of a female character in forums, others are more quick to rebuke them. There is no support for hypersexual discussion. This online focus has translated well into the real world.

Female competitors still face sexism at tournaments, but it has gotten better in the last few years. If any competitor is seen getting harassed, or if they ever feel uncomfortable, the harassing party is kicked out and often banned from tournaments. There is no tolerance for bad behavior. Also, when female players ask questions about certain aspects of the game, there is almost no condescending behavior towards the competitor. Their question is simply answered just like they would answer any other player. The gender barrier in the competitive gaming community still exists, but it is getting less and less prevalent. Through hard work from everyone in the community, this gap will, and should, disappear.

 

To read more on this subject, check out this eBook (available from the library)!

Female Fighters: Perceptions of Femininity in the Super Smash Bros. Community

Featured eBook: “Math Goes To The Movies”

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Math can play an important role in many major films. From The Martian to Moneyball, the ability to use math in difficult situations can be integral (get it?) to the story. The authors of the book Math Goes To The Movies aim to watch, break down, describe, and explain every movie that even hints at mathematical concepts. The authors even dissect a single scene in 1984 that has a math equation in it. Throughout the book, the authors either explain why mathematical concepts in movies are blatantly incorrect or praise the directors for getting the equations and concept exactly correct. This eBook is a fantastic read that will help you learn more about math!

eBook link

  • by Donny Turner

 

 

 

Spotlight on PubMed

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A part of the U.S. National Library of Medicine, PubMed “comprises more than 28 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books.” Essentially, PubMed is a medical database with citations, clinical trials, clinical queries, and more. Entries from MEDLINE and OLDMEDLINE are also available through PubMed.

 

PubMed FAQ:

Who uses PubMed?

Biology majors, nursing majors, Pharmacy students, professors, and researchers from around the world.

 

Does PubMed have tutorials?

Yes, their tutorials help you in searching through PubMed and finding the resources that you need.

 

Can I download a full article from PubMed?

No, PubMed generally just houses citations and abstracts. However, sometimes an abstract will provide a link to its full article, housed in a different database.

 

Can I access PubMed on my phone- is it mobile friendly?

Yes, PubMed Mobile was made to make PubMed easily accessible.

International Mountain Day (December 11th)

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Did you know that December 11th is International Mountain Day? At the library, we have several books and movies that feature rugged peaks and those who climb them. Check out the list below:

 

Jon Krakauer, mountaineer and nature writer, describes the 1996 tragedy on Mount Everest. Krakauer was one of the few who survived the dangerous summit, and he describes the events with a personal, empathetic voice. Krakauer’s experiences with other climbing expeditions lends well to this book, as he can describe maneuvers and mountain tricks with accuracy.

 

Have you ever wondered how mountains interact with the world around them? This eVideo, which you can view right from our website, shows the interesting process that mountains undergo as they adjust to the elements. The Films On Demand description expands:

Examining Earth’s mountain-building processes in detail, this program also studies the weathering, erosion, and mass wasting by which mountains are worn down. Viewers gain insight into the basic factors that underlie volcanic activity, the various types of geological faults, and the tectonic processes in which oceanic and lithospheric plates collide, separate, or slip past each other, resulting in dramatic physical changes. Eye-catching graphics as well as live-action footage from the Alps, Andes, Cascades, Rockies, and Himalayas help illustrate concepts.

 

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In this eBook, Japanese author Koji Uno presents two stories: “In the Storehouse” and “Love of Mountains.” The first story does not have to do with mountains, but the second story describes the author’s trips to the Shimo Shuwa town and the Shinano mountains. The author is not as impressed with these mountains as he expected, but he enjoys the weather and the company he meets in the area.

 

John Muir is an essential writer when it comes to nature- particularly the beautiful topography of California. Muir wrote about the American landscape in the late 1800s and early 1900s, describing land that may look vastly different now. He was a conservationist whose work helped protect the nature around us; in fact, Muir Woods National Monument in San Francisco was named for him.

 

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Annie Dillard explores how nature can reflect and awaken our spirituality in these essays. For instance, in “Total Eclipse,” Dillard writes about experiencing an eclipse on a mountain top, and how the surreal moment impacted her life. Dillard is great for those who want a voice for the feelings you get and the lessons you learn from spending time outside.

 

 

 

 

2018 In Review

2018

The library blog gained several new, dedicated writers in 2018. We wrote about everything from new books to wrestling and all that falls between. Let’s take a look back at the best of the blog from this year!

 

Amount of Blog Views: 2,055

Top 10 Posts Of 2018:

  1. Top 5 Underrated Library Perks
  2. Donny’s Deductions: The History of Professional Bowling
  3. How To Reserve A Study Room
  4. How To Use The Library As A Guest
  5. How To Print In The Library (For UU Students & Faculty/Staff)
  6. New In Our Archives: “The Private Papers of John Jeter Hurt”
  7. Myth-Shattering Fun Facts
  8. Top 5 Education Databases
  9. How To Download eBooks To Read Offline
  10. A Brief History of Union University

 

*these had the most views and interaction for this year

 

Top 10 Blog Post Quotes From 2018 (In No Particular Order):

1. Bowling two-handed makes it easier to hook the ball, thus scoring higher games with less experience. This makes the sport more accessible and many more middle and high school bowlers are using this technique. Jason Belmonte has helped grow the sport more than just about any other professional bowler. – Donny Turner, “Donny’s Deductions: The History of Professional Bowling”

 

2. A wrestling match can tell a story unlike any sporting event can, and sometimes it can do this better than television shows. A good wrestling match, if done well, can be up to half an hour long. This is longer than many TV shows and in that time, with few words and technically one scene, two wrestlers can tell a story unlike any other. – Brennan Kress, “Book Reviews: ‘Headlocks and Dropkicks’ by Ted Kluck”

 

3. 1975: it can be argued that this is the year that the first true “summer movie” was born, Jaws. – Matthew Beyer, “Matthew’s Monday Movie: ‘Jaws'”

 

4. Human beings pride themselves on their extensive and diverse knowledge of the world, but sometimes information gets confused along the way. Misunderstandings, urban legends, and flat out lies can infiltrate what we believe is common knowledge. – Ruth Duncan, “Myth-Shattering Fun Facts”

Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire.

5. Some afternoons you sit on the first floor of the library, bent over your Chemistry textbook, and hold up your eyelids because they stubbornly decide to close on you. “I can’t spend five dollars on a coffee this week. I’m broke!” you tell yourself. If you notice an acquaintance who’s in this situation, escort them into Modero and tell them to pick out a warm and caffeinated beverage – it’s on you. – Danielle Chalker, “Random Acts of Kindness Day”

 

6. Akage no An (Red Haired Anne) was introduced to Japan during the educational reforms of 1952. The series and its authorized prequel have both been adapted into anime, and two schools in Japan (the Anne Academy in Fukuoma and the School of Green Gables in Okayama) teach their students how to speak and behave as the admired character would. – Jordan Sellers, “Fun Facts You Might Not Know About Anne of Green Gables”

 

7. The older I’ve gotten, the more I’ve turned to nonfiction when I want to read something. Maybe I’m looking for advice, or maybe I just want to know how other people live, and think, and figure things out. To Shake the Sleeping Self is the perfect book to get inside someone else’s mind and feelings. Jenkins writes in a genuine, self-aware tone. He’s easy to relate to because he wonders about things we all do- who he is and who he will be in the future. – Olivia Chin, “Book Review: ‘To Shake the Sleeping Self'”

 

8. Are you an Anglophile? It’s okay, you can admit it. If you drink Earl Grey every morning, have the Union Jack hanging on your dorm room wall, or dream of going to grad school at Cambridge, you probably are. – Danielle Chalker, “Featured eBook: ‘The Cambridge Art Book'”

 

9. Reading can help increase empathy. By reading, especially fiction-reading, you increase your ability to empathize with others. If you can understand a character in a novel, you can better understand the people around you. – Brennan Kress, “On The Importance of Reading”

 

10. In the history of philosophy, it is important to learn about each philosopher’s predecessor, since many philosophers build off of what their mentor taught (or, interestingly, completely reject it). – Olivia Chin, “Featured Book: ‘A Short History of Modern Philosophy'”

 

Featured Writers:

Matthew Beyer

Danielle Chalker

Olivia Chin

Ruth Duncan

Brennan Kress

Jenny Manasco

Anna Poore

Jordan Sellers

Donny Turner