Logos Links: April 2020

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Library team members Amber Wessies and Olivia Chin have searched the Internet for the best book, movie, and library-related links. Learn more about library news around the world below.

 

Virtual Activities With The Library Of Congress

Watch authors read their books and live drawing sessions with the Library Of Congress.

 

Bird Library Livestream

This library has a mini-library for birds!

 

How To Stop Saying “Um,” “Ah, and “You Know”

Filler words aren’t inherently bad, but using them can distract your audience. Learn how to “embrace the pause” and stop using filler words with this Harvard Business Review article.

 

We Are YA Podcast

This podcast checks in with different Young Adult (YA) authors each day to find out how they’re coping with the pandemic and to see what they are working on.

 

Where To Find Free Poetry Resources For Kids Online

A list of poetry resources for children, but adults may enjoy them, too!

 

Now and Next: What A Post-COVID World May Mean For Libraries

What will the world be like when COVID-19 pandemic has ended? What trends that occur now will continue in the future specifically for libraries? Libraries are in a unique place to support and encourage positive changes to our lives after we get back to “normal.” This article discusses 10 trends in the world today and the possible impact or changes for the future.

 

Help Out Libraries And Archives 

Many libraries and archives have online transcription projects that you can be a part of from home. You can transcribe everything from Rosa Parks’ writings to Abraham Lincoln’s letters and help out archivists across the world. This article describes how to get involved!

 

Digital Escape Rooms

Some examples of what libraries are doing digitally- one fun program is a digital Harry Potter-themed escape room!

 

Library-Themed Backgrounds For Your Next Video Call

Backgrounds from the New York Public Library to use with Zoom!

 

Virtual Book Clubs

This article gives directions and a link for checking which books can be read aloud without copyright infringement.

 

All Of A Sudden, I’m Working From Home- Now What Do I Do?

More tips for working from home!

 

Virtually Visit 8 World-Class Libraries

Virtual travel is all we have right now, and, if visiting libraries is your jam, there are several libraries that have online tours.

 

 

 

Book Review: “The Curated Closet” by Anuschka Rees

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If you’ve ever found yourself staring at your closet in confusion, you’re not alone. The Curated Closet by Anuschka Rees is a guide to finding the right clothes for you, donating clothes that don’t work for you, and practicing sustainable fashion. It’s almost a workbook at times, and if you follow the instructions and answer the questions in the book, you will soon have an organized, specific-to-you capsule wardrobe.

What The Curated Closet gets right: This is a great book for anyone who “loves simplicity” as Rees says. If you are more of an “abundance lover,” you will probably not be as interested in paring down your wardrobe.

You will learn about the pros and cons of various fabrics, see examples of color palettes, and get tips on how to shop while on a budget. If you follow the prompts in The Curated Closet, by the end of the book you will be on your way to having the organized wardrobe of your dreams.

What The Curated Closet gets wrong: Obviously this approach isn’t for everyone. Some people will feel limited by having a capsule wardrobe or by only sticking to natural fabrics.

Who should read The Curated Closet: Readers who want to update and cull items from their closet and who use rules and regulations to simplify their lives.

Who shouldn’t read The Curated Closet: Readers who do not like having rules for what they wear and don’t want to put limits on which patterns and colors they have in their wardrobe.

 

The Curated Closet is not currently available at the library, but you can request it through Interlibrary Loan when physical books are allowed to re-circulate, and you can look for it at your local public library.

Reading List: Poetry

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Most poems can be read in one sitting, but their meaning may stay way with you forever. If you’re a fan of poetry, check out the poetry collections below. Some are eBooks that you can read from home, and others are print books that are available at the library.

 

Questions About Angels by Billy Collins (eBook)

Billy Collins – winner of a Guggenheim Fellowship, veteran of a one-hour Fresh Air interview with Terry Gross, and a guest on Garrison Keillor’s Prairie Home Companion – arrives at Random House with the poetic equivalent of a Greatest Hits album, seasoned with some wonderful new numbers. Read our review here.

 

American Primitive by Mary Oliver

50 lyrical poems by the author express renewal of humanity in love and oneness with the natural.

 

Selected Poems of Langston Hughes by Langston Hughes

The poems Hughes wrote celebrated the experience of invisible men and women: of slaves who “rushed the boots of Washington”; of musicians on Lenox Avenue; of the poor and the lovesick; of losers in “the raffle of night.” They conveyed that experience in a voice that blended the spoken with the sung, that turned poetic lines into the phrases of jazz and blues, and that ripped through the curtain separating high from popular culture.

 

The Collected Poems by Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes

Contains in sequence all the poetry written by the author from 1956 until her suicide in 1963, together with fifty selections from her pre-1956 work.

 

New Poets of Native Nations edited by Heid E. Erdich

This anthology gathers poets of diverse ages, styles, languages, and tribal affiliations to present the extraordinary range and power of new Native poetry.

 

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The Varorium Edition of the Poems of W.B. Yeats by W.B. Yeats

This book contains the complete poems of Irish author and activist W.B. Yeats. Yeats’ poetry speaks of love, nature, politics, and myths.

 

Selected Poetry by Victor Hugo and Steven Monte (eBook, includes poems in French and English)

This generous, varied selection of poems by one of France’s best-loved and most reviled poets is presented with facing originals, detailed notes, and a lively introduction to the author’s life and work. Steven Monte presents more than eighty poems in translation and in the original French, taken from the earliest poetic publications of the 1820’s, through collections published during exile, to works published in the years following Hugo’s death in 1883.

 

The Woman I Kept To Myself: Poems by Julia Alvarez

The Dominican-American writer presents a collection of autobiographical poems, each comprising three 10-line stanzas.

 

The Complete Poems: 1927-1979 by Elizabeth Bishop

A collection of 149 poems by the author.

 

Selected Poetry, 1937-1990 by João Cabral de Melo Neto (eBook, includes poems in Portuguese and English)

Brings together a representative selection of the work of one of Brazil’s most respected poets, including many poems published in English for the first time.

Spotlight On “Harvard Business Review”

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Harvard Business Review is one of the most widely-used and trusted business magazines in the U.S. Workers in HR, PR, marketing, and other business fields use the Harvard Business Review to keep up the latest news. You’ll find interesting articles about leadership, stats, general management, and workplace diversity in this magazine.

The library provides Union students and employees with free online access to the Harvard Business Review.

To access the Harvard Business Review, or any other online magazine that we subscribe to:

  1. Go to the library website.
  2. Type in “Harvard Business Review” in the search bar.
  3. Click one of the links to view it online. Different databases, like Business Source Complete, will provide access to Harvard Business Review.
  4. If you are off campus, you will be prompted to enter in your Union credentials. If there is trouble in accessing the link after that, then try a different link or email Stephen Mount at smount@uu.edu for help.

 

Top 5 New Testament Commentaries

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New Testament commentaries are some of our most used and asked about books here at the library. Most biblical commentaries in general are located in the BS-BT section of the library shelves on the second floor. Learn more about 5 of the most popular New Testament commentaries by clicking the links below!

*Book descriptions provided by the publishers c/o the library catalog.

For online and eBook biblical commentaries, click here.

 

New Testament Commentary Survey by D.A. Carson

Highly respected New Testament scholar D.A. Carson provides students and pastors with expert guidance on choosing a commentary for any book of the New Testament. The seventh edition has been updated to assess the most recently published commentaries. Carson examines sets, one-volume commentaries, and New Testament introductions and theologies, offering evaluative comments on the available offerings for each New Testament book.

 

The IVP Bible Background Commentary: New Testament by Craig S. Keener

This unique commentary provides, in verse-by-verse format, the crucial cultural background you need for responsible–and richer–Bible study. This revised edition of the standard reference work in its field has been expanded throughout to now provide even more up-to-date information by one of the leading New Testament scholars on Jewish, Greek, and Roman culture.

 

Hellenistic Commentary to the New Testament by M. Eugene Boring, Klaus Berger, & Carsten Colpe

Translations of 976 texts (compared with 626 in the German edition) are cited that directly illustrate the religious world into which early Christianity was born. Many of the texts are extensive enough to give a thorough sampling of how, for instance, miracle stories and birth stories of quasi-divine beings were told in the Hellenistic world, and how revelatory or conversion experiences were expressed in Greco-Roman religions. The texts are arranged according to the canonical order of New Testament books.

 

Zondervan Exegetical Commentary On The New Testament by various authors

With attention to issues that continue to surface in today’s church, the Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament series offers pastors, students, and teachers a focused resource for reading, teaching, and preaching.

 

Commentary on the New Testament: Verse by Verse Explanations with a Literal Translation by Robert Gundry

Going beyond questions of authorship, date, sources, and historicity, respected linguist and teacher Gundry offers a one-volume exposition of the New Testament that focuses on what is most useful for preaching, teaching, and individual study: what the biblical text really means.

 

Bonus: Word Biblical Commentary series by various authors

The Word Biblical Commentary delivers the best in biblical scholarship, from the leading scholars of our day who share a commitment to Scripture as divine revelation. This series emphasizes a thorough analysis of textual, linguistic, structural, and theological evidence.

 

People’s Choice Book Review: “The Handmaid’s Tale” by Margaret Atwood

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Recently, I asked the Union community via Instagram to pick a book for me to review (these are the kind of fun shenanigans I’ve been up to while working from home). The choices were Race Matters, The Sun Also Rises, and The Handmaid’s Tale.  Each of these books are available at the library, so patrons can read the review and then pick out the book. The votes came in, and The Handmaid’s Tale was chosen!

Spoiler-free description of The Handmaid’s Tale: a woman in a dogmatic society, the Republic of Gilead, must play the hated role of a Handmaid while grappling with memories of a past life.

I first read The Handmaid’s Tale a year or two ago. I’d heard of it before, and as the show based on the book gained more media attention, the buzz put the book back on my radar (although I still haven’t watched the show). I remember reading The Handmaid’s Tale as fast as my eyes could skim the words- the story was so engrossing and equal parts mind-numbingly sad and frustrating. As soon as I finished, I handed the book over to my husband, and he also read it blazingly fast. I strongly believe that The Handmaid’s Tale is a book by women, for women (and it attracts a largely female audience because it’s talking about female experiences, and boys don’t read “girl” books starting at an early age). But this story is also very much for men, too. In fact, I wish more men would read The Handmaid’s Tale.

Let’s get one thing straight about The Handmaid’s Tale before we dive in to the review: this is a book about a very messed up society. If you’ve kept up with author Margaret Atwood at all, then you know that she is obviously not promoting the mistreatment of women with this book. She is fighting against it in real life by showing how terrible it is in fiction. This is one of those books where some really rough acts and crimes are committed, but that doesn’t mean that the book is promoting this kind of behavior- it’s actually the exact opposite. Yet, The Handmaid’s Tale still winds up on banned book lists because people are afraid to read about real problems (that’s just my opinion there, but hey, this is a book review, so most of this is my opinion).

Mild spoilers ahead.

What The Handmaid’s Tale gets right: This is a very insulated story. It’s told from one woman’s perspective, and since she’s been subjected to brainwashing and abuse, sometimes her perspective is shocking. A lot of books about crazy government regimes focus on the politics or the activists, but this book zeroes in on one Handmaid’s story. I love that. It’s so much more personal and relatable than if we had 300+ pages about every terrible law that Gilead passed.

The Handmaid’s Tale is fictional. Some might call it satire, but it’s also a warning to the real world. Sometimes you can reach a wider audience by instilling your values and fears into fiction, and Atwood does this beautifully in The Handmaid’s Tale. A very paraphrased and basic version of her message is this: women are equal to men, but a lot of societies don’t treat them this way; biological differences are often used by those in power to subjugate women; and systemic oppression is wrong. As a feminist, I appreciate these messages being brought to the general public in the form of a story- this makes hard facts and opinions more accessible to everyone.

What The Handmaid’s Tale gets wrong: There are some slower parts to the book, but honestly you probably won’t notice. You’ll be too caught up in how awful Gilead is. Also, there’s a cliffhanger and we had to wait over 30 years for a sequel. So, if you’re just now picking up this book, you will be excited to know that you can read The Testaments right after (and you can read my review of The Testaments here).

Who should read The Handmaid’s Tale: Readers who enjoy dystopian books, feminist literature, and finally knowing what all of the hype is about.

Who shouldn’t read The Handmaid’s Tale: Younger audiences should wait until they are mature enough for the heavy content.

The Handmaid’s Tale is available as a print book at the library.

Content note: there are scenes of rape and abuse all throughout the book. Reader discretion is advised.

Spotlight On “Westlaw Next”

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For students who need to find law, business, or news articles, Westlaw Next is a great database with which to start. The library provides access to Westlaw Next through our “Databases” link on the library website. Simply scroll down the alphabetical list of databases to find Westlaw Next, click on the link, and then you can begin searching within Westlaw Next.

What can you access through Westlaw Next? A few of its resources include court cases, state and federal law information, briefs, statutes and court rules, legislative history, and more. Westlaw Next also provides a “Campus Help Guide” pdf on its search page so that you can find help with navigating and searching the database.

For more help finding the databases and articles that you need, call the library at 731.661.5070, or come to our Circulation or Research Desks for in-person assistance.

 

 

Book Review: “Leadership Is An Art” by Max De Pree

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Leadership Is An Art was recommended to me by our Library Director, Melissa Moore. 
This book was written by Max De Pree, the former CEO of Herman Miller, Inc. De Pree shares what he learned from his experiences as a leader and encourages future leaders to “define reality” for their teams.

 

What Leadership Is An Art does right: De Pree believes that a leader is someone who “removes obstacles that prevent people from doing their jobs.” The leadership described in Leadership Is An Art is one of servant-leadership: the focus is more on the people being led rather than on the greatness of the leaders themselves.

De Pree encourages leaders to know themselves, their assumptions about other people and their jobs, and their personal values. I would definitely agree that a good period of self-reflection can help someone realize how their beliefs affect their leadership. This can also help leaders be honest and straightforward with their team about what they expect, what their goals are, and how they can grow together.

This particular quote from James O’Toole’s foreword stands out:

In short, the true leader is a listener. The leader listens to the ideas, needs, aspirations, and wishes of the followers and then- within the context of his or her own well-developed system of beliefs- responds to these in an appropriate fashion.

As a manager, this is something I strive to do each day: listen to my employees and implement their ideas if we are able (sometimes the money isn’t there, or a policy they’re not yet familiar with could restrict their plan). If we aren’t able to do what they suggest, then we can look for alternate solutions and other ideas together.

 

What Leadership Is An Art gets wrong: This book is short and to-the-point (which could be a vice or virtue, depending on the reader). If you’re looking for in-depth stories and analysis, this may not be the leadership book for you.

 

Who should read Leadership Is An Art: Anyone who is in or is about to assume a position of leadership.

 

Who shouldn’t read Leadership Is An Art: I can’t think of anyone who wouldn’t get at least a few words of wisdom out of this book, even if they are not a leader currently.

 

You can check out this book from our Faculty Development Collection!

Reading List: Literary Classics

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Literature can be a broad genre, full of well-written tomes of years past and present. We’ve made a reading list of popular and diverse literary classics that are available at the library. For more books like these, search the subject tag “fiction” on our library catalog, or browse shelves PN-PS on the library’s second floor.

*book descriptions are from the library website and/or the publishers.

For classics in eBook form, click here.

 

Love In The Time Of Cholera by Gabriel García Márquez

Set on the Caribbean coast of South America, this love story brings together Fermina Daza, her distinguished husband, and a man who has secretly loved her for more than fifty years.

 

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Jay Gatsby had once loved beautiful, spoiled Daisy Buchanan, then lost her to a rich boy. Now, mysteriously wealthy, he is ready to risk everything to woo her back.

 

To The Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf

Psychological description of the Ramsay family at their summer home on the Scottish coast.

 

Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe

Two overlapping, intertwining stories, both of which center around Okonkwo, a “strong man” of an Ibo village in Nigeria.

 

Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte

Discovered on the streets of Liverpool, Heathcliff is rescued by Mr. Earnshaw and taken to the remote Yorkshire farmhouse of Wuthering Heights. Earnshaw’s daughter Catherine rapidly forms an attachment to him, but when Catherine’s brother takes over the Heights, Heathcliff is lowered to the position of a barely-tolerated farmhand.

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The Color Purple by Alice Walker

The lives of two sisters–Nettie, a missionary in Africa, and Celie, a southern woman married to a man she hates–are revealed in a series of letters exchanged over thirty years.

 

To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee

A young girl growing up in an Alabama town in the 1930s learns of injustice and violence when her father, a lawyer, defends a black man accused of raping a white girl.

 

The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway

The story of flamboyant Lady Brett Ashely and the hapless Jake Barnes in an age of moral bankruptcy, spiritual dissolution, unrealized love, and vanishing illusions.

 

Beloved by Toni Morrison

Part ghost story, part history lesson, part folk tale, Beloved finds beauty in the unbearable and lets us all see the enduring promise of hope that lies in anyone’s future.

 

Crime And Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky

Determined to overreach his humanity and assert his untrammeled individual will, Raskolnikov, an impoverished student living in the St. Petersburg of the Tsars, commits an act of murder and theft and sets a story into motion.

 

99942 Apophis

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In space, objects move at untold speeds through solar systems and galaxies. In our own solar system, thousands of objects soar through the void of space. Surprisingly, these objects never collide with Earth; that is, until 2029.

In 2004, scientists discovered an asteroid about the size of three football fields speeding toward Earth. Panic began to set in as the asteroid, named 99942 Apophis, had a probability of colliding with Earth. But before the conspiracy theorists began digging bunkers in their backyards, scientists found the probability of 99942 Apophis hitting Earth to be a whopping 2.7%.

Then, in 2006, new information revealed that the asteroid will have no chance of hitting Earth when it flies by in 2029. However, there may still be cause for concern. The path of the asteroid takes it closer to Earth than any other extraterrestrial object has been within the past 800 years. Apophis will come between the Moon and Earth at only 22,000 miles from Earth (whereas the moon is 238,900 miles from Earth). This will be the closest any asteroid the size of Apophis has come near Earth in recorded history.

If you happen to be on the side of the planet Apophis passes, there may be a chance that you can see the object with the naked eye. If you are unlucky enough to be on the other side of the planet, you will miss out on its arrival to Earth.

But here is where things get a little strange. Apophis will pass Earth twice in the next 18 years: first in 2029 and the next in 2036. It will not come by our corner of the solar system neighborhood until 2060, with the closest being its flyby in 2029. However, surprisingly, both trips in 2029 and 2036 will occur on April 13th. One of which, the 2029 occurrence, will be on Friday the 13th (spooky). Thankfully, the trip of Apophis by Earth in 2036 (this time a safe 35 million miles away) will be on a Sunday. There was, at one point, a chance that Apophis could hit a “keyhole” in its orbit in 2029 and come back around and hit Earth in 2036. However, most scientists believe that there is no realistic chance that this will happen, but there is still technically a chance.

So what would happen if Apophis did connect with Earth?

Apophis is 450 meters high, making it taller than the Empire State Building. The blast of an asteroid that size connecting with Earth in, say, New York City would destroy everything within a radius of around 14 miles. That would take out ⅘ of all New York. Then buildings within another 6.5-mile radius would be stripped to their foundations. That’s a big hit.

Even with scientists saying that the chances of this would be similar to the chances of winning the lottery, let us remember that people do win the lottery. Realistically, there is nothing to be afraid of, though the jury is still out on the passage of 99942 Apophis in 2060, which will hopefully be in our lifetimes. Will this asteroid ever collide with Earth? We will have to wait and see.

 

*written by Brennan Kress