How To Book The Online Interview Studio

in

We are excited to host the Vocatio Center’s Online Interview Studio here in the Logos building. This studio provides students with video-conference software and an aesthetic backdrop for their online interviews.

 

There are two ways that a Union student can book the Online Interview Studio:

Book online.

  1. Go to interview.vocatiocenter.com.
  2. Select the date and time for your interview. Bookings need to be made at least 24 hours in advance of your interview time.
  3. Click “Submit Times.”
  4. Fill out the online form with your student information.
  5. Click “Submit Booking.”
  6. When it’s time for your interview, arrive early at the library. Go to the Circulation Desk and check out the studio’s key and remotes using your student ID.
  7. Head to room 112 and get set up! There are instructions inside the studio.
  8. When the interview is over, please return the keys and remotes to the Circulation Desk.

 

Book at the Circulation Desk.

  1. Walk up to the Circulation Desk and ask to book the Online Interview Studio.
  2. Provide your name and email to the library employees so that they can make your booking.
  3. When it’s time for your interview, arrive early at the library. Go to the Circulation Desk and check out the studio’s key and remotes using your student ID.
  4. Head to room 112 and get set up! There are instructions inside the studio.
  5. When the interview is over, please return the keys and remotes to the Circulation Desk.

 

 

How To Contact The Library

Contact us!

 

If you have a question about finding books, articles, or DVDs, then you’ve come to the right place! We are happy to help you on your academic journey here at the library. But how can you ask us questions? There are several easy ways to contact us!

 

Face-to-face

Visit the Circulation Desk or the Research Desk on the first floor. Our library staff and student assistants will be happy to assist you!

 

Text

We have a new texting service! Text us at 731.201.4898 with your library-related questions.

 

Chat

There is a chatbox on the home page of our library website. You can use this service to ask us quick questions.

 

Call

The main library number is 731.661.5070.

 

Email

While each of the library staff have their own personal emails, you can also email the library in general at library@uu.edu.

 

Social Media

We are active on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and this blog (WordPress). Follow us for library news and updates!

 

However you choose to contact us, we are glad to help you!

New: Staff Picks Display

staff picks

Ever wonder what the librarians are reading? Looking for something new and recommended at the library?

Presenting: Staff Picks! This first floor display will show you which books and movies we recommend. The display will be refreshed with new choices regularly. You can read a little about each item (and who picked it) with our handy signs.

Currently, the Staff Picks are as follows:

 

Each item is available for check out. Happy reading!

Tips For Incoming Freshmen (From A Sophomore)!

pex tips freshmen

Brennan Kress reflects on his freshman year so that he can pass on some tips to new freshmen!

When I came to Union University in the fall of 2018, I can say that I felt a little out of my element. I struggled in certain areas of academic and social life. But now as a sophomore I look back, and with the benefit of better vision, I can see where I went wrong and what I could have done better. So, here are a few tips for freshmen as you start your journey at Union University.

 

  1. Don’t Be Intimidated By A PhD: Every professor at Union University cares for your academic career. They are also all well-versed in their area of study. As a freshman, I was impressed and sometimes intimidated with the vast knowledge that my professors held. Many times the feeling of inferiority on a knowledge level made me feel disconnected from my professors. Instead, I should have used their knowledge and gotten to know them better. So get to know your professors, and don’t let their wealth of knowledge intimidate you!
  2. Be Free To Change Your Mind: Many times I found myself in conversation doubling down on ideas I had little knowledge to support. I reverted back to what I had always been taught and failed many times to ask the right questions. College is, at a very basic level, about learning. You will be presented with ideas you have never heard before on topics you didn’t know existed. So, first, be open to new ideas even if they sound strange, bizarre, or at the outset, heretical. Take time to form your opinion and then once you have, feel free to change your mind! We are all learning and growing in multiple facets at college so don’t expect to think the same at the end of the year as you do now. And if somehow you do, I would argue you didn’t learn like you should!
  3. Take A Sabbath: One of the hardest parts about college is finding good time to rest. Many people struggle from a common inability to rest well. Some of us rest too much, sleeping in and missing classes, and some of us rest too little, staying up late grinding away on projects and homework. Thankfully, we all have a very Biblical mandate to rest, and one of the best ways to rest is to take a Sabbath. Every weekend my freshman year of college I chose either Saturday or Sunday (depending on which day made sense) and I would do no school work on that day. I would not study, read, or do any homework. Surprisingly, this practice actually made me a better student as I would prepare better in the days leading up to my rest. I would take that Sabbath as a day to sleep in, hang out with friends, and occasionally play a few video games. And the best part was that my grades never suffered. I have told countless people about my Sabbath and many thought it would be impossible to get all the work done and take a Sabbath. I don’t say this to brag, but I still managed a 4.0. All that to say, taking a Sabbath is doable and shows faith and trust in God. Pick a weekend day and take the day off! You won’t fall behind. In fact, it will keep you ahead!
  4. Be Willing To Sacrifice The Good For The Great: College is filled with many amazing opportunities for growth and learning. There are endless clubs and organizations on campus and one of the greatest challenges can be finding out what you feel most inclined to do. This can lead some people to try to do everything. A good skill to learn, especially as a freshman, is the ability to say “no” to some things so you can say “yes” to others. Don’t fill your plate to the brim. Find the things which you consider to be most valuable and pursue those.

 

How To Find Books By Union Authors

miller tower.jpg

Did you know that many Union faculty and staff members are also published authors? The library has a sizeable collection of books that were written or edited by Union authors. There are 4 major ways that you can see these books:

  1. We have a “Union Authors” list online! Just click the link to view the list. You can also find this list by using the drop down menu that says “Find Materials” on the library’s home page.
  2. If you know the author or the title of the book by name, you can search for them via our library website. The website will tell you the book’s location in the library and its availability status.
  3. If you just want to browse the collection, you can walk around the book stacks and find Union Authors by noticing books with “Union Authors” stickers. These stickers are red and attached to the spine of the books. Hint: a large amount of books by Union Authors are in our theology section.
  4. One final way to see books by Union Authors is by viewing the “Union Book Project” via www.uu.edu. You can search for specific authors or by year to see the books that were released in a particular time period. It’s a great resource!

 

Pick up a book by your favorite professor today! Chances are it’s on our shelves.

5 Tips For Surviving Severe Weather

pex weather 1

Chances are that if you’re a student at Union University, you’ve had the unpleasant experience of dealing with the threats posed by severe weather. Union’s unique location near what is now coined “Dixie Alley” or “The New Tornado Alley” puts it in the threat zone for strong storms more frequently than most other places in America. Each year a variety of weather hazards impact campus, none more dangerous, however, than those that include the threat for tornadoes. Knowing how to properly respond to these threats is an important part of living at Union, and one that every student should take seriously. In order to help you know more about these threats and make your life less stressful when they occur, I have compiled a list of helpful weather tips for next time stormy weather impacts campus.

 

Know what to expect, but don’t freak out –

Most severe weather at Union is advertised at least a day or so in advance. Have a method for being informed on these matters. Follow a local meteorologist on social media, be friends with Union’s own weather geek (that’s me), or have some other way to check into local/reliable sources. Weather apps can be great products for day to day weather forecasts but are not well suited for detailing severe weather threats. Also remember that a forecast is just that, a prediction. It is not designed to cause fear, but to provide you with the opportunity to plan ahead and make informed decisions.

 

Know the terminology –

What is the difference between a tornado warning and a tornado watch? This is one of the severe weather questions I get asked the most. A tornado watch is issued to alert people to the possibility of a tornado developing in your area. At this point, a tornado has not been seen but the conditions are very favorable for tornadoes to occur at any moment. The watch area is typically large, covering numerous counties or even states, and is often in effect for many hours.

A tornado warning means that a tornado has been sighted or indicated by weather radar. There is imminent danger to life and property. Warnings typically encompass a much smaller area (around the size of a city or small county) that may be impacted by a tornado identified by a forecaster on radar or by a trained spotter/law enforcement who is watching the storm.

w

 

Know what to do –

As Union students, this has been drilled into our brains from day one. In the event of a tornado warning, we are told to take shelter in the bathrooms of a lower floor dorm. If you are in the library, the first floor bathrooms are where you take shelter.

However, there are situations where this is obviously not an option. One of the most dangerous places to be during a tornado is on the road. If a tornado warning is issued while you are driving, the best option is to pull into the nearest public building and seek shelter in a restroom. Small interior rooms in sturdy buildings are ideal, but don’t spend too long trying to find the perfect location and risk being caught outside.

 

Don’t become complacent –

It’s easy to do. Union experiences an average of two tornado warnings per year, a large majority of which are never actually accompanied by a tornado. This is complicated even further by an alert system that is initiated by warnings which may not even affect campus (but simply clip a portion of Madison county). Despite attempts by the NWS to move away from county based warnings through the use of polygons, this has yet to become incorporated into many local warning systems (such as tornado sirens or UU alerts). Such a situation took place earlier this year when a tornado warning more than 14 miles south of campus initiated UU and city alert systems, despite the storm never posing a threat to the University (see image).

 

As a result of such inconsistencies, I have observed the tendency of Union students to react nonchalantly to many warnings. While it may seem that most are unwarranted, playing the odds is a very dangerous game. There may be times when a tornado warning is issued and you have very little time to respond. Unless you have access to information indicating otherwise, it is wise to treat every warning as though a tornado is imminent.

w 1.png

Get a good radar app –

I believe everyone has the capacity to understand detailed radar data. Unfortunately the radar imagery provided to you by most weather apps is low quality data that often lags and is highly misleading. Being able to observe storms ahead of time on radar, along with accompanying warnings can be a huge help as you anticipate severe weather. One of the best sources of detailed radar and storm information is the user friendly RadarScope™ application. I highly recommend this product to anyone who wants access to high resolution radar data and warnings. This product is available on the the iOS and Android app stores. You can also check out their website here: www.radarscope.app.

*written by Grant Wise. You can follow his Union weather updates on his Facebook page!

How To Look At Union Yearbooks Online

LWF

When you want to look up a family member or certain year in Union’s history, the “Lest We Forget” Union yearbooks can be a helpful resource. An easy way to search through the yearbook collection is by using the library website online. Provided below are instructions for access.

To access the “Lest We Forget” Union yearbooks:

  1. Go to the library website.
  2. Click on Archives and Special Collections under Quick Links.
  3. Click University Archives.
  4. Lest We Forget will come up in the middle of the page. Click the books to access them. You can find them by year and click through them like an online book to find people’s names. (If you just click this link, it will take you straight to them).

 

For other archival material, take a look at the Online Archives.

A Brief History Of Union University

college hall

*This piece was originally written by Jenny Manasco and uses So Great A Cloud Of Witnesses as a resource.

Union University stems from several different colleges which originated in the early 19th century and eventually merged into the Union University found in Jackson, Tennessee today.  Jackson Male Academy was the first of these predecessors and was founded in 1825, but was transformed after just two decades into West Tennessee College.

A school with history similar to that of West Tennessee College was founded in Murfreesboro and named Union University.  West Tennessee College and Union University Murfreesboro both experienced repercussions from the Civil War and had to recover in the following years.  Union University Murfreesboro, which suffered greater war time losses, eventually closed for good following a typhoid epidemic in 1873.

Around the same time, Tennessee Baptists were looking for a location to establish a college that would serve as a unifying force across the state. Jackson was chosen as the location and the land and endowment of West Tennessee College was transferred to Southwestern Baptist University. Many of the early faculty had relocated from Murfreesboro, having served in the final years of Union University.  Hence, Southwestern was the “union” of West Tennessee College and Union University Murfreesboro, and the name was officially changed to Union University in 1907.

Union University has progressed over the last one hundred years, continuing in the Christian tradition under which it began, and has become a university recognized throughout the nation today.

Baggett, James Alex. So Great a Cloud of Witnesses. Union University Press, 2000, 1-5.

Spotlight On The Online Archives

online archives

Did you know that you can view artifacts from Union’s history online?

While the library does contain a physical Archives space, many of the documents have been digitized for online viewing.

What kind of documents can you see? The University Archives preserves the history of Union University and its predecessor institutions, Jackson Male Academy, West Tennessee College, Union University Murfreesboro and Southwestern Baptist University. This history is told through official records of the university, papers of former faculty and administrators, university publications, papers of alumni, and memorabilia.

To get started, visit the “Archives and Special Collections” link on the library’s website. Using this Archives guide, you can access university yearbooks (Lest We Forget), older editions of the Cardinal and Cream, Union bulletins, and more.

Many of these documents can be clicked on, with the pages flipping in the style of a physical book. This makes it easy to flip through entire yearbooks and magazines without having to leave your chair.

lwf

For Archives questions, contact Melissa Moore, Stephen Mount, or Paul Sorrell.

Yoga For Readers

In honor of International Yoga Day, student assistants Kayla and Shelby have agreed to demonstrate their favorite poses for exercising both mind and body. Whether you are a seasoned bookworm or you are using the library for the first time, we have a way for you to settle in and get the most out of your library time!

Level: Beginner

BlogPhoto1Relaxed Pose: This is a comfortable position for marathon-reading a fun book of your choice. The arms of the chair provide support for your back and elevation for your feet, combining to create the ultimate casual reading experience. Note: This move is not recommended for use while studying or reading intense fiction.

 

BlogPhoto9The Finals Week: To properly execute this move, you must get to the library early in order to claim enough space and furniture to stretch out to your full length. This is perfect for the evening before your most difficult exam, as it allows you to switch back and forth between studying and power naps efficiently.

 

Level: Intermediate

BlogPhoto6Modified Plank: This position will allow you to strengthen the two most important muscle groups- the core and the brain. Form is particularly important to prevent excess pressure on your elbows and strain on your eyes.

 

 

BlogPhoto5The Upside Down Turtle: When you’ve been sitting in uncomfortable classroom chairs all day, this pose will relieve back pain by elevating your feet and taking pressure off your spine. It is enhanced by reading John Green’s latest novel or any turtle-related book in our Family Room, which will cure textbook-induced headaches.

 

Level: Advanced

BlogPhoto2The Inverted Bookworm: Sometimes it is helpful to get a different perspective on what you are reading. Turning upside down is the perfect way to do just that! Having your head closer to the ground will change the way you see the world while improving circulation to your brain.

 

BlogPhoto10The Sneaky Reader: This pose is perfect for when you see your Welcome Week Crush in the library studying. Bonus points if you can do this with their favorite book so you have something to talk to them about when you finally get the nerve.

 

 

What are your favorite reading and/or yoga poses?