Logos Links: June 2020

lib links 1

Library team members Amber Wessies and Olivia Chin have searched the Internet for the best book, movie, and library-related links. Learn more about library news around the world below.

 

31 Children’s Books To Support Conversations On Race, Racism, and Resistance

A descriptive, helpful list of children’s books from Embrace Race.

 

Publishers Sue Internet Archive Over Free E-Books

With COVID-19, more free resources became available on the Internet. However, publishers are pushing back over what they consider to be piracy.

 

The 5 E’s Of Inquiry-Based Learning

Not sure how to engage students in scientific inquiry? Not a problem. The 5E Inquiry-Based Instructional Model can serve as your guide during the design and implementation of STEM instruction.

 

Anatomy of a Book

Old-fashioned words used to describe books, as provided by The New Yorker.

 

It’s Juneteenth!

Blog about miscellaneous African American art and poetry, as well as a celebration of Juneteenth.

 

The Ancient History of Board Games

What did game night look like thousands of years ago? Before Monopoly and Candy Crush, ancient people were playing mehen and the Game of Twenty Squares.

 

The State of Babies Yearbook

Need some statistics on babies and families in the U.S.? Check out the 2020 State of Babies Yearbook, where you will find changing demographics, health policies, and early learning recommendations.

 

NASA Names Headquarters After “Hidden Figure” Mary W. Jackson

If you enjoyed reading or watching Hidden Figures, you’ll be glad to know that the real-life Mary W. Jackson is being honored by NASA.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spotlight On “The Chronicle Of Higher Education”

chronicle

The Chronicle of Higher Education is an online publication that carries articles about college enrollment, teaching tactics in large classrooms, salaries of tenured employees and university presidents, and other news related to higher ed. Many professors and education professionals use this newspaper to keep up with other colleges around the country. While you can see some of The Chronicle’s articles online for free, others require a subscription. That’s where the library comes in.

To access The Chronicle of Higher Education, or any other online magazine that we subscribe to:

  1. Go to the library website.
  2. Type in “The Chronicle of Higher Education” in the search bar.
  3. Click one of the links to view it online. Different databases, like Academic Search Complete, will provide access to The Chronicle of Higher Education.
  4. If you are off campus, you will be prompted to enter in your Union credentials. If there is trouble in accessing the link after that, then try a different link or email Stephen Mount at smount@uu.edu for help.

Spotlight On “ProQuest U.S. Dailies”

pex newspapers

Newspapers in print are becoming a hard thing to find in some libraries.  However, some libraries, like the Union Library, have subscriptions to newspaper databases where users can access newspapers online rather than in print. ProQuest US Dailies is a database that contains a collection of national newspapers; it allows for library patrons to access and read newspaper articles published in major newspapers such as the Wall Street Journal and The New York Times, among others.

Users can search within ProQuest US Dailies by entering a topic or the title of a newspaper in the search bar.  If you want to browse the issues or find articles related to a topic, you have the option to do either. Users also have several options in narrowing down their search query; you can narrow down your search by document type (i.e. article, company profile, interview) as well as source type (i.e. article or audio-visual material).  Searching by language is also available, but you can only choose between English and Spanish.

With print newspapers becoming more rare, online access to major newspaper publications is a helpful thing for libraries to have. ProQuest U.S. Dailies is a helpful tool that patrons can easily access for either pleasure or research. Users can access this database from the list of Databases, E-books, and Media from the library’s home page.  For more information about finding newspapers in the library or online, click here.

Spotlight On “Academic Search Complete”

academic search complete

Academic Search Complete, an EBSCO-hosted database, is a general database that the Union Library subscribes to. We call it a general database because you can find articles from many different subject areas, including sciences, mathematics, and humanities. Since this is an EBSCO database, you will find the search features and look of the site like many other databases. EBSCO allows you to search more than one database at a time. This is a nice feature because it makes your research more efficient.

Academic Search Complete starts you with an advanced search, which means you can use multiple search terms (topics or words to describe your topic). Academic Search Complete lets you filter results using date ranges, document type, location, publication, etc. You will also want to note the filters for full text (which makes sure you pull up full articles) and scholarly peer-reviewed articles (reviewed by an expert in the field). Many professors want peer-reviewed articles, so this filter can save you time and energy when searching.

I often recommend Academic Search Complete due to its simple interface and the numerous filters. Academic Search Complete pulls up results based on relevance; it also highlights your search terms within the record, so you know why that article was included in the results list. I also like being able to search in more than one database at the same time. There are some other great features in Academic Search Complete that a Research Coach would love to show you for improving your own research efforts.

Academic Search Complete is found on many of the research guides, but can also be accessed by going to the Databases, E-Books, and Media quick link on the library’s homepage. The databases are listed alphabetically- scroll until you see Academic Search Complete.

Spotlight On “The Atlantic”

the atlantic

The Atlantic is a popular online magazine that covers the latest news and cultural phenomenons around the world, with a particular focus on the U.S. Some articles of The Atlantic are not accessible to viewers who don’t have a subscription or who have used up their free articles for the month. However, the library provides Union students and employees with access to The Atlantic through the database Gale Popular Magazines.

To access The Atlantic:

  1. Go to the library website: www.uu.edu/library.
  2. Click on the “Databases, E-Books, & Media” link under Quick Links.
  3. Scroll down the alphabetical list until you find Popular Magazines. Click the link.
  4. Once you are in the Popular Magazines database, click “Publication Search” on the bottom right of the home page.
  5. Choose the option to “List All Publications.”
  6. Scroll down the alphabetical list until you see The Atlantic. Click that link, and then you will be able to see articles from The Atlantic by their publication dates.

Spotlight On “ERIC”

eric

ERIC, Education Resource Information Center, is an educational database sponsored by the Institute of Education Services and free for anyone to use. ERIC is a go-to database for research related to education including almost 2 million records from the 1960s to the present. You will find reports and articles from non-profit organizations and government agencies, legislative hearings, and education journal articles and books. Please note: ERIC is for educational research, so you will not find lesson plans, textbooks, or book reviews. If you do need those things, check out some of our other databases, or reach out to a Research Coach for assistance.

As a Union employee or student, you can also search the ERIC database using the EBSCO interface. You may want to use the EBSCO version because the search features are similar to other databases you already use, such as Academic Search Complete or APA PsychInfo. The filters (like scholarly peer-reviewed, full text, date ranges, and language) will work in ERIC through EBSCO. However, the ERIC website is also user friendly and has some of the same filters like peer-reviewed and full text. These filters are found under the search bar.

You can access articles directly on the ERIC website. You can also find the link for ERIC on the Databases, E-Books, and Media quick link on the library homepage. The Database list includes access to ERIC and ERIC through EBSCO. Try both methods of access to decide which you prefer. If you access ERIC through EBSCO, you will be prompted to go to ERIC in order to download the full article (follow the prompts for finding full text).

Spotlight On “Opposing Viewpoints In Context”

opposing viewpoints

One of the many databases that the Union library has access to is Opposing Viewpoints in Context. This database is provided by Gale, which is part of the Tennessee Electronic Library (TEL).

The home page of Opposing Viewpoints in Context gives users a chance to search for information by entering search terms into the search bar. However, users can explore various topics before researching by scrolling down a bit to see many different areas of interest. These areas allow users to see which research is available in an area of interest and explore various topics.

Information comes to users in a variety of sources, which include: academic journals, newspaper and/or magazine articles, reference materials, videos, and others. But what is most unique about this database is that it provides viewpoint essays for users to read that give information about a topic from both sides of the argument.

Students can access Opposing Viewpoints in Context by scrolling down the list of databases found by clicking the “Databases, E-Books, and Media” link on the library’s home page. Students will be prompted to sign in with their Union password and username if accessing the database off campus.

Happy researching!

Spotlight On “Westlaw Next”

westlaw

 

For students who need to find law, business, or news articles, Westlaw Next is a great database with which to start. The library provides access to Westlaw Next through our “Databases” link on the library website. Simply scroll down the alphabetical list of databases to find Westlaw Next, click on the link, and then you can begin searching within Westlaw Next.

What can you access through Westlaw Next? A few of its resources include court cases, state and federal law information, briefs, statutes and court rules, legislative history, and more. Westlaw Next also provides a “Campus Help Guide” pdf on its search page so that you can find help with navigating and searching the database.

For more help finding the databases and articles that you need, call the library at 731.661.5070, or come to our Circulation or Research Desks for in-person assistance.

 

 

Spotlight On “Gender Studies Collection”

pex writing

Gender Studies Collection, provided by Gale, is a database that the library subscribes to. Within the Gender Studies Collection, students can find articles on topics related to gender, family studies, health, feminism, and cultural norms. You can also limit your search to peer-reviewed, full-text articles to make your research easier.

Because Gender Studies Collection is also a Gale database, it has a “Topic Finder” that groups certain subjects together. You can use the Topic Finder to get started on your research and find articles and ideas that are similar to each other. Some of the topics include: Women’s Studies, Gender Equality, Sexuality, Female Identity Feminism, Nationalism, and more.

To access the Gender Studies Collection, or any other database, simply go to the library website. Click on the “Databases” quick link, then scroll down the list of databases until you find Gender Studies Collection. Accessing databases through the library website works much better than trying to Google them.

 

Spotlight On “The Biblical Archaeology Society Library”

bas library

The Biblical Archaeology Society Library (BAS) is a database that our library subscribes to. Union students and employees can access this database by using the library website (click on the Databases quick link on the home page, and then scroll down the database list to find the BAS Library).

Through the BAS Library, students can explore special collections on King Herod the Great, Biblical Interpretation, Where Jesus Walked, The Birth of Jesus, Dead Sea Scrolls, and more. These special collections include videos, articles, and summaries of each topic. Three different publications are also available through the BAS Library: Biblical Archaeology Review, Bible Review, and Archaeology Odyssey. Readers will find helpful and accessible articles in each of these journals.

If you want to learn more about the Bible, Israeli history, and archaeology, visit the BAS Library.