Logos Links: June 2020

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Library team members Amber Wessies and Olivia Chin have searched the Internet for the best book, movie, and library-related links. Learn more about library news around the world below.

 

31 Children’s Books To Support Conversations On Race, Racism, and Resistance

A descriptive, helpful list of children’s books from Embrace Race.

 

Publishers Sue Internet Archive Over Free E-Books

With COVID-19, more free resources became available on the Internet. However, publishers are pushing back over what they consider to be piracy.

 

The 5 E’s Of Inquiry-Based Learning

Not sure how to engage students in scientific inquiry? Not a problem. The 5E Inquiry-Based Instructional Model can serve as your guide during the design and implementation of STEM instruction.

 

Anatomy of a Book

Old-fashioned words used to describe books, as provided by The New Yorker.

 

It’s Juneteenth!

Blog about miscellaneous African American art and poetry, as well as a celebration of Juneteenth.

 

The Ancient History of Board Games

What did game night look like thousands of years ago? Before Monopoly and Candy Crush, ancient people were playing mehen and the Game of Twenty Squares.

 

The State of Babies Yearbook

Need some statistics on babies and families in the U.S.? Check out the 2020 State of Babies Yearbook, where you will find changing demographics, health policies, and early learning recommendations.

 

NASA Names Headquarters After “Hidden Figure” Mary W. Jackson

If you enjoyed reading or watching Hidden Figures, you’ll be glad to know that the real-life Mary W. Jackson is being honored by NASA.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading List: Children’s Books About STEM

childrens books stem

 

Children’s books are great resources for STEM education: they’re written at a level that a child can understand, and books about science, technology, engineering, and math for children are increasingly published. The library’s Family Room houses books on these subjects as well as fiction and middle-grade books. If you’re a student teacher or a parent, you can use this reading list to pick up educational children’s STEM books from the library.

*Book descriptions provided by the publishers, c/o the library catalog

 

The Boy Who Harnessed The Wind by William Kamkwamba

When 14-year-old William Kamkwamba’s Malawi village was hit by a drought in 2001, everyone’s crops began to fail. His family didn’t have enough money for food, let alone school, so William spent his days in the library. He came across a book on windmills and figured out how to build a windmill that could bring electricity to his village. Everyone thought he was crazy but William persevered and managed to create a functioning windmill out of junkyard scraps. Several years later he figured out how to use the windmill for irrigation purposes.

 

Hey, Water! by Antoinette Pointis

Splash along with a spunky little girl who realizes that water is everywhere. But water doesn’t always look the same, it doesn’t always feel the same, and it shows up in lots of different shapes. And so the girl launches into a spirited game of hide-and-seek with water, discovering it in nature, in weather, and even in herself.

 

Little Leonardo’s Fascinating World of Science by Bob Cooper

Introduces kids to the vast and varied areas of science and the different types of scientists they can aspire to become. Whether it’s ancient dinosaur bones unearthed by paleontologists, anthropologists studying different cultures around the globe, or new planets discovered by astronomers, there’s bound to be something here any child will find fascinating and appealing.

 

The Girl With A Mind For Math by Julia Finley Mosca

This is a rhyming-text picture book about Raye Montague. After touring a German submarine in the early 1940s, young Raye set her sights on becoming an engineer. Little did she know sexism and racial inequality would challenge that dream every step of the way, even keeping her greatest career accomplishment a secret for decades. Through it all, the gifted mathematician persisted, finally gaining her well-deserved title in history: a pioneer who changed the course of ship design forever.

 

The Great Kapok Tree: A Tale of the Amazon Rainforest by Lynne Cherry

The many different animals that live in a great Kapok tree in the Brazilian rainforest try to convince a man with an ax of the importance of not cutting down their home.

 

The Darkest Dark by Chris Hadfield

Chris loves rockets and planets and pretending he’s a brave astronaut, exploring the universe. Only one problem: at night, Chris doesn’t feel so brave. He’s afraid of the dark. But when he watches the groundbreaking moon landing on TV, he realizes that space is the darkest dark there is, and the dark is beautiful and exciting, especially when you have big dreams to keep you company. (Inspired by the childhood of real-life astronaut Chris Hadfield.)

 

Even An Octopus Needs A Home by Irene Kelly

Shows how animals solve the problem of locating safe places in which to live and raise families.

 

The Brooklyn Bridge: A Wonders of the World Book by Elizabeth Mann

Describes the construction of the Brooklyn Bridge, from its conception by John Roebling in 1852 through, after many setbacks, its final completion under the direction of his son, Washington, in 1883.

 

Are You A Beetle? by Judy Allen

This colorful first nature book introduces preschoolers to the world of the beetle. Ideal for reading aloud or as a first reader, the witty text and detailed illustrations bring this familiar creature to life. Young children will be fascinated by this tiny living thing found right in their own backyard.

 

Moonshot: The Flight of Apollo 11 by Brian Floca

Here is the story of the Apollo 11 mission to the Moon: a story of leaving and returning during the summer of 1969, and a story of home, seen whole, from far away by steady astronauts in their great machines.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading List: Children’s Books About Women In History

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Did you know that March is Women’s History Month? The library has many excellent books on this subject; in particular, we’d like to highlight some of our children’s books about women in history. Adults and kids alike will enjoy these beautifully illustrated and thoughtfully written stories about women who changed the world.

 

Reading List:

Girls Think Of Everything: Stories of Ingenious Inventions By Women by Catherine Thimmesh

Expanded and revised, this new edition of the best-selling book celebrates the ingenious inventions of women throughout time. As inspiring as they are fascinating, these stories empower readers to imagine, to question, to experiment, and then to go forth and invent!

 

Who Was Sacagawea? by Judith Bloom Fradin

Learn all about the life and times of Sacagawea, the Shoshoni woman who helped explorers Lewis and Clark find their way. This book begins with the story of how Sacagawea came to be depicted on the dollar coin and continues with Sacagawea’s life story.

 

Moses: When Harriet Tubman Led Her People To Freedom by Carole Boston Weatherford

Follow both the physical and spiritual journey of Harriet Tubman as she escapes slavery and then helps others to find freedom, too. Moses is a great book for learning about antebellum life in the U.S and African American history.

 

I Could Do That! Esther Morris Gets Women The Vote by Linda White

In 1869, a woman whose “can-do” attitude had shaped her life was instrumental in making Wyoming the first state to allow women to vote, then became the first woman to hold public office in the United States. The story of Esther Morris is inspiring and told in a fun way by I Could Do That!

 

Sachiko: A Nagasaki Bomb Survivor’s Story by Caren Stelson

Sachiko is the story of a young girl who lived through the bombing of Nagasaki in World War II. While this book is geared more toward middle grade and early high school kids, it’s an emotional, moving look at a tragic event in history.

 

Hidden Figures: The True Story of Four Black Women and the Space Race by Margot Lee Shetterly

This version of the bestselling Hidden Figures is perfect for children to understand. You’ll learn all about NASA, space, science, and the African American women mathematicians who greatly contributed to NASA’s programs in spite of Jim Crow laws.

 

Rosa by Nikki Giovanni

This striking picture book depicts Rosa Parks’ famous stand for Civil Rights, as well as the events that followed. Illustrator Bryan Collier’s cut-paper images make the story leap off the page for young readers.

 

Amelia And Eleanor Go For A Ride by Pam Munoz Ryan

Two famous women in history in one book? Sign us up! This fictionalized account of the night that Amelia Earhart flew Eleanor Roosevelt over Washington, D.C. is charming and fun.

 

The Girl Who Drew Butterflies: How Maria Meran’s Art Changed Science by Joyce Sidman

Beautifully illustrated, The Girl Who Drew Butterflies tells the story of Maria Meran and how she figured out the process of metamorphosis. Some of Meran’s own artwork is featured in this book!

 

These books are available for check out in the library’s Family Room!

Spotlight On Library Displays

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Did you know that the library creates displays to showcase our collection? Each month, a new display theme goes up on the first-floor bookcase near the stairs. Monthly themes include:

  • Star Wars
  • Harry Potter
  • Summer Reading
  • STEM
  • Historical Fiction

and more!

 

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We also have books on display in the Family Room. These include children’s books and young adult books. Pictured below is our “Universe of Stories” display!

universe display

 

All of the books, audiobooks, and DVDs on display are available for checkout. Just take the item you want to the Circulation Desk and they will check it out for you.

Featured Author: Maurice Sendak

The path to success is to take massive, determined action.-1

 

Maurice Sendak was born on June 10th, 1928 in New York City. Sendak excelled at art as a child; he would often draw illustrations while sick at home. When Sendak grew older, he began to illustrate children’s books. In 1956, the first book that was both illustrated and written by Sendak was published: Kenny’s Window. 1968 would see one of Sendak’s most popular and renowned books: Where The Wild Things Are (a Caldecott medal winner).

Some of Sendak’s other well-known books include:

 

Sendak has also lent his illustrations to many children’s books, including The Moon Jumpers and Brundibar.

In 2012, Sendak died at age 83. However, his books and illustrations for children will continue to delight kids for generations.

Click here to see which Sendak books the library has to offer.

 

A Week of Kids’ Reads

Looking for a fun book to share with your child or little sibling? Well, don’t stop at one – get one for every day of the week so you can have a daily reading time! Whether you’ve got the midweek blues or feel like celebrating the weekend, we’ve got a book for you (and your family)!

monday

  • Monday
    If You Take a Mouse to School by Laura Numeroff
    Sure, Monday is the dreaded start of the school week – but look on the bright side and enjoy this story of the hilarious escapades of a mouse in the schoolhouse.

tuesday

  • Tuesday
    Tuesday by David Wiesner
    A zany wordless tale of a very unusual day involving a flying frog invasion!

wednesday

  • Wednesday
    The Wednesday Surprise by Eve Bunting
    On Wednesday nights when Grandma stays with Anna everyone thinks she is teaching Anna to read. But the two have a different surprise up their sleeve for Dad’s birthday. A beautiful story about a loving family and the joy of literacy.

thursday

  • Thursday
    Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No-Good, Very Bad Day by Judith Viorst
    While Wednesday is often hailed as the awfullest day of the work week, everyone knows that Thursday really takes the cake. It’s near enough to the end of the week for you to be exhausted, but not quite near enough to see the light at the end of the tunnel (see Friday). Commiserate with Alexander’s unfortunate day by reading this book to your overtired kids.

family fun

  • Friday

Friday means it’s time to have fun! School has let out for the weekend. Check out Family Fun Nights: 140 Activities the Whole Family Will Enjoy for tons of games and ideas for a great night with your children.

saturday

  • Saturday
    Saturday Market by Patricia Grossman
    Join Ana and Estela as they sell their handmade goods at a Saturday market in Mexico. Enjoy the colorful illustrations and learn a few Spanish words along the way.

sunday

  • Sunday
    The Lord’s Prayer illustrated by Tim Ladwig
    The text of the Lord’s prayer is presented along with beautiful oil-painting illustrations about a father and daughter. May the words of this treasured prayer stay with your family as you head into a new week!

Top 5 Award-Winning Children’s Books

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The library strives to obtain award-winning children’s books for our Family Room. Education students and parents alike should have access to high quality stories for their kids. This list describes just a few of the best award-winners that the library has available.

*all descriptions courtesy of WorldCat*

Julie of the Wolves

julie of the wolves

Author: Jean Craighead George

Award: Newberry Medal

Description: “While running away from home and an unwanted marriage, a thirteen-year-old Eskimo girl becomes lost on the North Slope of Alaska and is befriended by a wolf pack.”

 

Jumanji

jumanji book

Author: Chris Van Allsburg

Award: Caldecott Medal

Description: “Left on their own for an afternoon, two bored and restless children find more excitement than they bargained for in a mysterious and mystical jungle adventure board game.”

 

Roll Of Thunder, Hear My Cry

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Author: Mildred D. Taylor

Award: Newberry Medal

Description: “A black family living in Mississippi during the Depression of the 1930s is faced with prejudice and discrimination which its children do not understand.”

 

The Giver

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Author: Lois Lowry

Award: Newberry Medal

Description: “Given his lifetime assignment at the Ceremony of Twelve, Jonas becomes the receiver of memories shared by only one other in his community and discovers the terrible truth about the society in which he lives.”

 

Where The Wild Things Are

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Author: Maurice Sendak

Award: Caldecott Medal

Description: “Max, a naughty little boy, sent to bed without his supper, sails to the land of the wild things where he becomes their king.”

 

National Dr. Seuss Day

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Did you know that March 2nd is not only the National Day of Unplugging, it is also National Dr. Seuss Day! Today is a great day to find a classic Dr. Seuss book and take a nostalgic trip into your childhood.

The Union University library has…

Oh, the Places You’ll Go!

Fox in Socks

The Lorax

Green Eggs and Ham

…along with many others!

 

The library also has a fantastic Biography on Theodor Geisel, the creative genius behind Dr. Seuss.

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All of these Dr. Seuss books and more are found in the Family room on the first floor and the Biography about Dr. Seuss is in the Main Stacks on the second floor.

Enjoy this fun read-aloud, courtesy of Reading Pioneers on YouTube:

 

*Post written by Donny Turner

 

 

 

Christmas Story Time

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Come join us for our Christmas Story Time! Stay afterward to check out all of the Christmas-themed children’s books in the Family Room.

Featured Author: Eoin Colfer

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Born in Wexford, Ireland, in 1965, Eoin Colfer first became interested in writing through stories about Vikings and adventure. He taught primary school before penning his first book, Benny And Omar. But it was the arrival of his second book, Artemis Fowl, that brought Colfer the recognition he now has as a talented author of children’s books. The Artemis Fowl series follows a preteen boy with criminal genius and the fairy world that he uncovers.

artemis fowl books

Colfer has now written over 15 books for young adult audiences. He plans to keep writing as long as possible.

I will keep writing until people stop reading or I run out of ideas. Hopefully neither of these will happen anytime soon.

  • Eoin Colfer

 

For a list of Colfer books that the library has available, click here.