Good Things To Do During COVID-19

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It’s currently a wild time in the world, to say the least. With COVID-19 ravaging our planet, staying at home and washing your hands has become first priority in our lives (read CDC guidelines here). Maybe you’re looking for something fun or helpful to do while we navigate uncertain territory? We’ve compiled a list of good things to do and use during this time:

 

Donate blood.

For Jackson residents, you can donate blood at Lifeline Blood Services at 183 Sterling Farm Drive.

 

Workout at home.

Campus Rec has been making creative at-home workout videos. Check them out on Instagram! You can also work on your yoga skills for free with Yoga With Adriene. And then, my personal favorite exercise: you can go for a run! It’s free and as long as you stay away from others, it’s safe to do so.

 

Put a dent in your reading list!

Staying at home = the perfect time to get reading! We have Reading Lists, Book Reviews, and eBook recommendations for you.

 

Take your children or younger siblings on a “bear hunt,” or put out a bear for children to view at your home or dorm.

Bear hunts have become a popular pastime for cooped-up kids, and they meet the requirement for social distancing.

 

Create side walk chalk art.

Chalk art is an easy way to brighten someone’s day without getting close to them!

 

Stream a free video with Films On Demand.

The library subscribes to an eVideo service called Films On Demand. Look it up on our website under the “Databases, E-Books, and Media” tab and watch something new!

 

Attend a virtual prayer group or church service.

Church teams have gotten extra creative during the pandemic with livestreams, apps, and video resources. If you haven’t found a local church yet, check out Union’s list of area churches.

 

Sew a face mask for a healthcare worker.

If you know how to sew, or if you’ve been wanting to learn, now is the time to get sewing! Here is a guide on how to sew a face mask.

 

Watch Sir Patrick Stewart read Shakespearean sonnets.

April is National Poetry month! What better time to listen to some classic poetry read by the Shakespearean actor Sir Patrick Stewart?

 

Use Zoom to schedule a Research Coach appointment or to connect with family/friends.

Zoom is a video conferencing tool that is essential for a time like this. Here’s how to schedule a Research Coach appointment with Zoom.

 

Take some time for self-care.

Check in on yourself and your friends. This is a difficult time for many in regards to mental health. Here are some self-care tips from Psychology Today. And here is a guide for diaphragmatic breathing, which can help with stress management.

 

Dive into spring cleaning.

When you’re stuck at home, it’s easy to find house-related projects to do. Maybe it’s time to clean out your closet or kitchen cabinets, or you can finally hang up those picture frames.

 

Watch “Some Good News With John Krasinski.”

Sometimes you just need to hear about the good things that are still happening in the world. Thankfully, beloved actor John Krasinski made a video to share good news on YouTube.

 

Find a new job.

Some places may need extra help during the pandemic. Check local listings to see where you can help out and get some extra cash!

 

Make a bucket list for when this is over.

Every time you think of something you want to do or go see, or a friend you miss, write it down on a piece of paper and put it into a jar. Then, when things are safe again, you can pull suggestions out of the jar and complete your bucket list!

 

Get into coloring.

Here is a website with free adult coloring pages!

 

 

What are your good ideas for spending your time during this pandemic? Let us know in the comments!

 

Top 5 Tips For A Great School Year

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The fall semester is finally here: new friends, new classes, and new school supplies. Unfortunately, you might be adding “new stress” to that list. So what can we do to make this school year a great one? We’ve got 5 tips to help you do your best and reduce stress this year.

 

Make a planning system.

Whether you use a bullet journal, a paper planner, or your phone to jot down notes, it’s a good idea to have a planning system. You’ll have a lot to keep up with- from school assignments to work hours- so find which system helps relieve your stress and use it!

 

Sleep.

As tempting as it is to stay up all night chatting with your roommates, your body will appreciate you more if you get 6-8 hours of sleep instead. Plus, your brain may remember more from your study session if you get a proper amount of sleep.

 

Ask questions.

No, really, it’s okay to ask where Cobo is, or how to use Paw Print, or what your professor meant in that last lecture. Union employees are always happy to help you and point you in the right direction- and chances are, your fellow students are, too.

 

Remember your purpose.

God is still in control, even through stressful times and bad situations. Pick up the Word regularly, and get involved in a local church, a prayer group, and/or a mentorship with a trusted advisor. There’s so much more to life than that next test. God has a purpose for you!

 

Actually use the library.

We’re more than just a study space! We have tons of books and articles that you can use for research and class assignments. Once you graduate, you won’t have unlimited access to these resources, so make the most of it while you can!

 

 

How To Find New Books At The Library

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Want to see the latest books that we’ve purchased? We have 3 different ways that you can see new books at the library!

 

The New Books Shelf

Did you know that we have a special section for the new books we acquire? The New Books Section is located on the second floor of the Logos. The shelves include selected titles on display, and each new book is marked with a green sticker on its spine indicating the date of its acquisition. The New Books Section makes it easier to browse the latest books by shelving them in a group together for a time.

 

The New Books List (On Our Website)

We keep an updated list of our new books and movies on our website. You can find the link to this list under the “Quick Links” section of the website’s homepage; or just click here!

 

Scrolling New eBooks

The new eBooks that we’ve purchased can be seen on the library website’s homepage. They automatically scroll across the screen just below the library chat box.

 

If you need any help finding the new books, ask a library team member at our Circulation Desk or our Research Desk!

What Should I Read Next? (Summer Edition)

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It can be overwhelming trying to find new books to read. There are new stories released daily, and, if you already have a teetering to-be-read pile, adding yet another book can be intimidating. Still, there’s something exhilarating about finding your new favorite read! In this blog series, the library staff will recommend books to you based on your genre preferences. We do a lot of reading when we’re off work, and we enjoy testing out the new books that we get for the library! If you would like to get a personalized recommendation from us, please use the library chat function on our website.

So, what should you read next?

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  • If you like mysterious origin stories, North Carolina, and interesting character development: Where The Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens. Many of the librarians have given rave reviews to this bestselling book, which was released in August 2018, and all of them have different opinions about the ending!

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  • For fans of intense real-life experiences, teaching and teachers, and survival techniques: Educated: A Memoir by Tara Westover. Library director Melissa Moore said that she couldn’t put this book down and highly recommends it.

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  • If you’re looking a lesser-known classic novella and a unique vampire tale: Carmilla by J.S. Le Fanu. This short, easy read has a gothic setting, mysterious illnesses, and a young female antagonist. Carmilla is also widely considered to be one of the first recorded vampire stories.

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Spotlight On “Volunteer Voices”

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Are you interested in learning about Tennessee history? The Volunteer Voices project is a collection of documents, artifacts, photos, and other facets of local culture. The library provides access to Volunteer Voices as a database in our Databases, E-Books, and Media tab. You can also access Volunteer Voices via the Tennessee Secretary of State website.

So, what can you read about in Volunteer Voices? The project has many broad topics to choose from, including the following [click the links to access Volunteer Voices]:

Broad Topics
African-Americans
Architecture
Arts and Literature
Children and Childhood
Civil and Human Rights
Education
Family Life and Gender Relations
Farming and Agriculture
Frontier Settlement and Migration
Government and Politics
Health and Medicine
Immigrants and Immigration
Law and Legal Documents
Music and Performing Arts
Native Americans
Nature and the Environment
Popular Culture and Folklife
Religion
Science and Technology
Social Reform
Sports and Recreation
Trade, Business and Industry
Transportation and Internal Improvements
Wars and Military
Women

You can also choose to search the collection for specific terms, or you can simply browse the collection and see what the project has to offer. You’ll find documents like personal letters, campaign advertisements, pamphlets, photographs, and more. The collection allows you to narrow your search down by choosing subjects, genres, and the historical era of your topic.

The next time you’re searching for Tennessee history, head to Volunteer Voices and get started. You can also tour our library’s online archives, search our catalog here, visit the Tennesee Room at the Jackson Madison County Library, or visit the Madison County Archives.

 

 

Featured Book: “Life Inside My Mind: 31 Authors Share Their Personal Struggles”

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If you’ve ever dealt with (or are currently dealing with) OCD, ADHD, depression, Alzheimer’s, and other mental health disorders, you are not alone. That is the overarching message of Life Inside My Mind: 31 Authors Share Their Personal Struggles. This book includes essays from various writers about their experiences with personal conflicts. Each essay is from a different author, so the writing style varies, and one author even incorporates free verse to tell her story.

Some of the authors included are as follows:

  • Amber Benson (who portrayed the character Tara on Buffy the Vampire Slayer)
  • Jessica Burkhart (author of Wild Hearts)
  • Scott Neumyer (a popular journalist)
  • Sara Zarr (author of Story of a Girl).

It can be comforting to read about others who have struggled, gotten help, and learned how to cope. However, some of the stories depicted could be hard to read about for someone who is currently experiencing a similar situation- so be aware of this book’s heavy nature.

Several of Life Inside My Mind‘s lessons can be summed up in this passage from Amber Benson:

As much as your friends love you and want to be there for you, it’s not their job to fix you. Ignoring the problem, or pretending “you’ve got it under control,” will only make things worse. A therapist, psychologist, or psychiatrist knows that they’re doing (they went to school for a long time in order to do this), and they know how to help you get back on track . . .

Whether we like it or not, the stress of of being a human being can be overwhelming, and having a safe space to talk about our problems, assess whether our brains are working correctly, make sure there’s nothing chemically out of line . . . well, I think that’s super important. I know I need that safe space in my life if I’m going to be a productive member of society.

Getting help when you need it- whatever that looks like for you- is encouraged by all of the authors in this book. They’ve been there themselves, and many of them are still figuring it all out. Pick up Life Inside My Mind when you need to know that you’re not alone in your struggles.

 

 

Featured Book: “Should I Go To Grad School?”

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The purpose of this book is to provide a broad, unempirical look at how a variety of people in the arts, academia, social sciences, and humanities have personally engaged with the problem of grad school.

Should I Go to Grad School? contains 41 different essays about people’s experiences, grad school statistics, and advice. While the book does not address STEM majors, it does contain wisdom for students in the humanities. Whether you’ve always wanted to go to grad school or are just considering it as an option, there is probably a story in this book that you can relate to.

Many of the authors tell their stories, answering questions like, “How did they get the job they wanted?” and “Why did they choose the grad school option?” There are inspiring stories sprinkled among solely practical ones.

Eben Klemm, a fellow at MIT, gives this advice:

Would my life be more or less complete, would I be better or worse, richer or poorer, doing more or less good if I had gone to grad school? Yes to all of the above. Anything can become a serious, almost academic pursuit if you care to work at it deeply and honestly (or dishonestly) within a community of similar individuals who choose to care about it as much as you do. You just have to find them. The important thing is to be sure of the questions that you are willing to pursue forever, and to determine the best ways and institutions that will allow you to do so. Other people are waiting for you.

Art, English, History, and Sociology majors: pick up this book if you’re thinking about expanding your education. There’s no one right answer for everybody- but out of these 41 different experiences, at least one may be able to help you.

Library FAQs

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We’re here to answer all of your questions at the library! Here are some of our most popular questions from our students and guest patrons.

Student FAQs

  1. How can I apply to work in the library as a student assistant?

Students can go online through the Vocatio Center to submit their resume. The Circulation Manager will review their resume and may invite them to an interview. If approved, the students will need to submit paperwork to the Vocatio Center and sign up for hours on the Circulation schedule.

 

  1. I need more prints. Can I buy them?

Yes, we have print cards for $1 and $5, it just depends on how many prints you need. If you need to do a print refund, though, that falls under IT- you can request one here.

 

  1. I need to request transcripts. Where can I do that?

The library does not handle transcripts. We can transfer you to the registrar’s office instead, or you can request them online via the registrar’s page.

 

4. I need to keep this book for a little longer than the due date for a project, but I’ve reached my renewal limit. Can you help?

Yes, generally we can extend the due date of a book when a student needs it for school-related purposes.

 

5. Can the library schedule appointments for the Writing Center?

No, the library and the Writing Center are separate entities (that do work together, though)! You can schedule an appointment with the Writing Center through their website here.

 

6. What are the library’s hours?

You can view the library’s hours 24/7 on our website!

 

7. I need help with APA/MLA/Turabian citations. Can the library help me?

Yes, you can schedule an appointment with a Research Coach for help with citations. You can also check out the APA manual, the MLA manual, and the Turabian manual from the library.

 

Guest FAQs

 

  1. Does the library offer tutoring services?

No. The library does have research help for Union students, but not for high schoolers, children, or adults who do not attend Union.

 

  1. Does the library partner with any local home school or education programs?

No, but families with children are welcome to visit the library.

 

  1. I’m a college student at Jackson State. Can I check out books from Union?

Yes, through a local university & college agreement, higher education students at other nearby institutions can check out a limited number of Union library items. See our website for more information.

 

  1. Can I look at eBooks and articles on the library website as a guest?

Yes and no. If you are on Union’s campus, you can view eBooks and articles on our library website. If you are not on campus, you will not be able to view them without a Union login.

 

  1. I’m a Union alumnus. What can I do in the library?

As an alumnus, you qualify for a free guest card, which allows you to check out up to 3 books. You can also be logged onto a computer as a guest and print for $.10 a page.

 

  1. Can I pay with a credit card?

No, we can only accept cash or checks at Circulation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How To Make An Appointment With A Research Coach

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Did you know that the library has professional Research Coaches who can help you with your assignments? These Coaches can assist you in finding resources for papers, projects, theses, etc. When you go to a Research Coach, you will leave with an increased knowledge of how to use our databases, where to find the books you need for your topic(s), and how to use the citation style that your professor requires!

So, how can you visit a Research Coach?

One way is to find a Research Coach at the Research Desk, located on the first floor of the library near the inside stairwells. However, if a Research Coach is not available at that time, you can make an appointment with them for another day.

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To make an appointment with a Research Coach:

  1. Go to the library website, www.uu.edu/library.
  2. Click on the “Research Coach” link under the “Quick Links” tab.
  3. Once you’re on the Research Coach page, click the red button that says “Make An Appointment With A Research Coach.”
  4. Select the time and date that works for you.
  5. Show up to your Research Coach appointment and get the help you need!

Featured Books About Personality Types

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Chances are you know someone who can rattle off their Enneagram number, their Myers-Briggs letters, their Hogwarts house, and maybe even their astrological sign. Many people have a fascination with personality types, quizzes, and theories since they can often learn more about themselves and other people by identifying different personalities. We’ve compiled a few lists of the best personality-based books that the library has to offer. If you’re interested in learning more about the way you think, feel, and act, check out one of these books!

List of Enneagram-Based Books:

  1. Mirror for the Soul: A Christian Guide to the Enneagram by Alice Fryling
  2. The Enneagram Advantage: Putting the 9 Personality Types to Work in the Office by Helen Palmer
  3. The Enneagram: A Christian Perspective by Richard Rohr
  4. The Path Between Us: An Enneagram Journey to Healthy Relationships by Suzanne Stabile
  5. The Road Back To You: An Enneagram Journey to Self-Discovery by Ian Morgan Cron and Suzanne Stabile

 

List of Myers-Briggs Based Books:

  1. Gifts Differing: Understanding Personality Type by Isabel Briggs and Peter Myers
  2. Type Talk at Work by Otto Kroeger
  3. Do What You Are: Discover the Perfect Career for You Through the Secrets of Personality Type by Paul Tiegger and Barbara Barron-Tiegger

 

Other Books About Personality:

  1. The Normal Personality: A New Way of Thinking About People by Steven Reiss
  2. Personality: What Makes You The Way You Are by Daniel Nettle
  3. 10 Best College Majors For Your Personality by Laurence Shatkin
  4. Personal Intelligence: The Power of Personality and How It Shapes Our Lives by John D. Mayer
  5. Personality Theories: A Global View by Eric Shiraey