Top 5 Cookbooks At The Library

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Are you a college student who’s getting tired of takeout? We have several cookbooks in the library that can help you find easy, nutritional recipes that you can use in your dorm. These top 5 cookbooks have beautiful photos of the foods mentioned and step-by-step instructions to ensure your success.

 

The Healthy College Cookbook: Quick, Cheap, Easy by Alexandra Nimetz, et al.

This eBook is the perfect place to start your cooking journey! Learn how to set up your first kitchen and flip through 200 recipes that anyone can make.

 

Comfort Food Makeovers by Taste of Home Books

Comfort Food Makeovers is full of familiar, delicious recipes that are also low calorie. Its goal is to make you feel at home while also helping you make healthier dishes.

 

Oh She Glows Everyday Cookbook by Angela Liddon

Looking for something healthy and meatless? Angela Liddon’s cookbook will walk you through a variety of plant-based recipes. This book is available in our Recreational Reading section.

oh she

 

Campbell’s Creative Cooking With Soup by Campbell Soup Company

For chilly days, soup really hits the spot. This cookbook offers over 19,000 combinations of easy soup recipes for the hungry student.

 

Gluten-Free, Hassle-Free: A Simple, Sane, Dietician-Approved Program In Eating Your Way Back To Health by Marlisa Brown

If you practice a gluten-free diet, look no further than this helpful eBook. Gluten-Free, Hassle-Free offers tips in making the change to a gluten-free lifestyle and maintaining good health.

 

 

Top 5 Recent Bestsellers At The Library

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Since the Union library is an academic one, the books we have on our shelves are primarily for research and school-related purposes. However, we also have some “fun reads” and bestsellers in our Recreational Reading section (which is on the 2nd floor near the DVDs). Several of these bestsellers have been popular here at the library, appearing on our most checked out items list for several months now. You can find brief descriptions of them, as well as links to where they are located in the library, below:

 

Educated by Tara Westover

Publication Year: 2018

Genre: Memoir

Description: Tara Westover describes her upbringing in an isolated, survivalist family who did not trust conventional schools or medicine. Westover eventually went to college and learned about the world beyond her mountains.

 

Where The Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens

Publication Year: 2018

Genre: Mystery

Description: The “Marsh Girl” is a local legend in Barkley Cove, North Carolina. This mysterious figure emerges in the midst of local crime.

 

The Nickel Boys by Colson Whitehead

Publication Year: 2019

Genre: Historical fiction

Description: Two boys struggle to survive the horrors of their juvenile reformatory and racism in the Jim Crow era.

 

The Great Alone by Kristin Hannah

Publication Year: 2018

Genre: Historical fiction

Description: A family moves to Alaska in the 1970’s and deals with harsh wilderness, PTSD, and complicated relationships.

 

The Testaments by Margaret Atwood

Publication Year: 2019

Genre: Dystopian fiction

Description: More than 15 years after The Handmaid’s Tale, the oppressive Gilead regime is still standing- but there are signs that it is beginning to rot from within. (You can read our review of The Testaments here.)

 

 

 

Book Review: “The Testaments” by Margaret Atwood

the testaments

 

Have you ever read a book, gotten to the end, and then thought, “WHAT? What’s going to happen next?” The Handmaid’s Tale will make you do that.

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood is known as a modern classic. Written in 1985, this novel is about an alternate society, Gilead, that runs an oppressive regime against women. Women are forced into different social classes. Some of the main ones mentioned are:

  • Handmaids (essentially surrogate mothers for Wives who can’t naturally have children)
  • Marthas (serving women)
  • Aunts (ruling women who make sure the others are put in their place)
  • Wives (married and subordinate to husbands, who rule over Gilead)

Without giving too much away, The Handmaid’s Tale ends on an exciting cliffhanger. And for 34 years, there was nothing else written about it.

Until now: enter The Testaments, the sequel to The Handmaid’s Tale. I think it came as a surprise to most readers when Margaret Atwood announced that there was, at long last, another book in the Handmaid universe. At the time of my writing, The Testaments is currently the top bestselling book in the U.S. I couldn’t wait to read it, so I snatched it up as soon as the library’s copy came in (sorry).

*There are minor spoilers ahead, so be aware.

 

What The Testaments gets right: It’s downright chilling how the global problems in the book echo the ones in real life. I’m sure Atwood did that on purpose, but still. It’s always eerie when a fictional dystopia has a little too much in common with the real world.

The Testaments tells its story with three different narrators: Aunt Lydia, Daisy, and Agnes Jemima. Each woman has played a different part in the system of Gilead- one helped enforce it, one suffered from it, and one lived outside of it. Through their perspectives, we get a more complete picture of the political climate surrounding Gilead. For instance, the other countries don’t like Gilead. There are protests everywhere, the global climate is falling apart, and there’s an Underground Femaleroad that women can use to escape from Gilead- if they’re not caught and punished.

So much of what happens to these women is staggeringly upsetting. In fact, much of their suffering is unique to simply being a woman (such as purposefully being denied feminine products while in captivity), which is something I haven’t read much about in other dystopias. The Testaments is a great reminder to not take the little things in life for granted (or the big things either, like freedom of speech, freedom to own property, and the freedom to vote, which are denied these women).

Even though The Testaments was often hard to read because of the mistreatment of women, I loved this book. I read a review in The Guardian where a reader said that she felt like the book was talking directly to her, and that’s exactly how I felt, too. Margaret Atwood really knows how to pull you in and make you think with her writing. She might make you cry, too- I did.

 

What The Testaments does wrong: The Testaments is more heavy-handed and political than The Handmaid’s Tale, largely due to the different narrators and their positions in society. The narrators in the sequel are more self-aware and have years of perspective to look back on, while Offred from the original book lived more in the moment, which didn’t allow her to think about much more beyond her own strategies to stay alive and undetected. She often thought about her lost past, but it was less in political terms and more personal. We had access to her thoughts and suppressed feelings, and we as readers knew less about the wider scope of things that The Testaments gives us.

There’s nothing inherently wrong with The Testaments being more obvious in tone- in fact, many might say that this kind of tone is needed right now- but I missed the personal horror of The Handmaid’s Tale. The Handmaid’s Tale had so many subtle moments that made me double take and reread, as well as blatant anti-woman tactics. The Testaments stays fairly blatant throughout the whole book- which, again, could be due to the fact that we as readers already know all about about Gilead and its evil because of The Handmaid’s Tale. The Testaments doesn’t have to be subtle because, as the saying goes, The Handmaid’s Tale walked so The Testaments could run.

 

Who should read The Testaments: Older teenagers and adults, especially people who have read and enjoyed The Handmaid’s Tale.

 

Who shouldn’t read The Testaments: Younger teenagers and children. It’s too mature in theme for them to fully understand.

 

Content note & mild spoilers: There are sad (but fairly brief) recollections of sexual and physical abuse in The Testaments, as well as some language. This is a heavy book.

 

 

 

 

Top 5 Books To Read Now That Fall Is Here

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Okay, I know the weather around here doesn’t scream “fall.” But September 23rd is the official first day of the fall season for 2019, and that has to count for something! For those of us who look forward to fall each year, here is a list of books that are especially perfect to read during the season of falling leaves, pumpkins, scarves, and outdoor sports:

 

Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery

Reason: “I’m so glad I live in a world where there are Octobers.” – Anne Shirley. Sure, it’s not quite October yet, but we’re almost there!

 

Goodbye Summer, Hello Autumn by Kenard Pak

Reason: This is a charming children’s book about the changing of the seasons. Look for it in our Family Room!

 

The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson

Reason: Get into the spooky spirit with Shirley Jackson’s classic horror novel, which was recently adapted into a Netflix show.

 

The Secret History by Donna Tartt

Reason: Fall means school, and The Secret History is all about a group of New England college students. The novel’s element of suspense just adds to its appeal.

 

Native American Son: The Life and Sporting Legend of Jim Thorpe by Kate Buford

Reason: For some people, fall is all about football season! Dive into football history with this fascinating biography of the formidable athlete, Jim Thorpe.

 

 

 

 

Library Staff Picks: What’s On Your “To Be Read” List?

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For some people, the “to be read” (or TBR) pile of books never stops growing. But what if you’re still looking for something else to read? The library staff are happy to share the books that they are planning to read next- and who knows, you may see some book reviews of these in the future, once we’ve read them!

 

TBR Lists Below

Olivia Chin, Circulation Manager:

  • Next up for Olivia Chin is the fourth book in George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire series, A Feast For Crows. She is hoping to finish the current books in the series this fall; she’s also hoping that George R.R. Martin finishes writing the last two books!
  • Olivia is also looking forward to reading the true-crime biography Manson: The Life and Times of Charles Manson by Jeff Guinn (which she’s ordered through Interlibrary Loan).
  • And she’d like to finally read the thriller Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn.

 

Amber Wessies, Instruction Librarian:

 

Matthew Beyer, Library Associate:

 

Shelby Lucius, Student Assistant:

 

 

Featured eBook: “Ethics In Health Administration”

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Identifying changes in the United States’ health care structures, Ethics In Health Administration by Eileen E. Morrison seeks to educate healthcare professionals on using ethics in the workplace. The library has access to the fourth edition of this manual, which has additional chapters that the previous editions did not.

Ethics In Health Administration talks about generational challenges, the emerging senior service market, insurance issues, and examples of ethical dilemmas. It’s a great resource for decision makers in the healthcare field as well as for new doctors and nurses as they prepare for their roles. Each chapter defines key terms to make the reading easier as well.

You can access Ethics In Health Administration by searching for it on the library website and clicking its eBook link. If you are off campus, you will need to sign in with your Union credentials to view the eBook.

 

Moments In History: August 9th, 1974

richard nixon

Matthew Beyer has begun a “Moments In History” series to raise awareness of important historical events. Each post will also have book recommendations about the moment in history, using our extensive history collection in the library.

 

August 9th, 1974

Resignation Of U. S. President Richard Nixon

 

The 37th President of the U.S. presided over a time period of great upheaval and uncertainty for the nation. His personal and political accomplishments were eventually dwarfed by his spectacular downfall, which to this day has fueled the public’s skepticism of blind trust in the executive office of government.

President Nixon was quite popular early on due to his foreign policy differences in relation to his predecessors. Diplomatic negotiations in dealing with the Soviet Union and communist China helped ease tensions during the Cold War. Nixon proved to be very popular in domestic politics and oversaw the Apollo 11 mission.  Yet all of these achievements could not save him from involvement in the infamous Watergate scandal in the summer of 1972.  Five men were caught burglarizing and attempting to wiretap the Democratic National Committee’s headquarters in Washington, D.C. The President’s involvement and the attempted cover up of the incident would lead to extensive congressional investigations, culminating in the release of taped conversations that implicated President Nixon and others in a criminal conspiracy to obstruct justice.

The release of the “Smoking Gun” tape (revealed by the FBI) clearly showed Nixon’s involvement, and, as a result, articles for impeachment began in the House of Representatives. President Richard Nixon decided to resign from office rather than face impeachment, and on August 8th, 1974, he gave a televised farewell address to the American people. The next day, the president and his wife proceeded to the White House lawn, boarded the Presidential helicopter, and flew away. His vice president Gerald Ford would go on to succeed him and issue an official presidential pardon of all crimes. Nixon would continue in his private life to be a pariah in American politics.

Today marks the 45th anniversary of that historic day.

If you found this post interesting and would like to learn more on this topic, the Union University Library offers numerous books and films related to the subject:

 

 

 

Featured Book: “Unexpected Art”

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What would you do if, one day, you saw a giant rubber duck on top of the Bowld? Would you assume that it’s an art project?

The book Unexpected Art shows us beautiful photographs of art installations all over the world. These installations can be surprising and are often a part of the local landscape. The artists want their art to be seen and enjoyed by the people around them, and so they have brought their art to the public space.

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Unexpected Art showcases work by Adel Abdessemed, Amanda Browder, Nick Cave, Myoung Ho Lee, Cornelia Konrads, and many more. You’ll see all kinds of creative pieces, from wallpapered dumpsters to aluminum landscapes to giant rubber duckies. This book is fun to flip through, but you can also read about how each artist made their art and why they made it that way.

You can check out Unexpected Art from the library!

Moments In History: July 30th, 1945

The World War II cruiser USS Indianapolis at Pearl Harbor Hawaii

Matthew Beyer has begun a “Moments In History” series to raise awareness of important historical events. Each post will also have book recommendations about the moment in history, using our extensive history collection in the library.

 

July 30th, 1945

 Sinking of the USS Indianapolis

Today marks the 74th anniversary of the sinking of the USS Indianapolis in 1945. The ship was on a top secret mission to deliver parts that would be used to construct an armed and operational atomic bomb codenamed “Little Boy,” which was scheduled to be used on the city of Hiroshima and intended to force the Empire of Japan to surrender.  The Indianapolis completed its mission to deliver the bomb’s components; however, on her return voyage, disaster struck as she was hit by two torpedoes from a Japanese submarine. The vessel sank in a mere 12 minutes, with their frantic distress calls going unanswered.

Out of a crew of 1195 men, 300 went down immediately with the ship. The surviving crew were left stranded in the middle of the South Pacific for the next three and a half days. With many wounded, few life jackets, and fewer life boats, the surviving seamen endured unimaginable suffering. There was stifling heat during the day and hypothermic conditions at night. The crew also experienced unquenchable thirst that could lead to the congestion of delirium-inducing saltwater. The worst and most feared fate still awaited these desperate sailors: hundreds of sharks! After the third day the survivors were spotted by a friendly aircraft on patrol, and a rescue craft was sent to aid them, but the total number of those that survived out of the 900 men that went into the water was only 317.

This event would mark the single greatest loss of life by any U.S ship in the navy’s entire history. As of July 2019, there are only 12 remaining living survivors to this tragedy. So if this article finds you today, take a moment and say a prayer for those still living and for those who were lost in the horrors of World War II.

The Union University Library offers several books on this subject for those who would like to learn more:

 

 

 

 

Book Review: “Amal Unbound” by Aisha Saeed

amal unbound

 

This is what I now remember most about my last afternoon at school- the smell of the dusty chalkboard, the sound of the students lingering outside the door, and, mostly, how easily I took my ordinary life for granted.

Amal Unbound by Aisha Saeed is the story of a bright Pakistani girl who has to make the most of unfortunate circumstances. When Amal’s mother begins to struggle with post-partum depression, Amal stays home from school to take care of her younger sisters. She dreams of a better future when she can go to college and become a teacher. When Amal accidentally offends a member of her village’s ruling family, she is forced into indentured servitude and her whole world turns upside down.

What Amal Unbound gets right: It’s refreshing to read a book that’s not set in the United States. Amal’s story is uniquely Pakistani, and reading about her culture helped me learn new words and customs. The injustice that Amal faces is heartrending, but we cheer for Amal as she learns how to navigate the world and still be herself. Aisha Saeed wrote the fictional story of Amal as a reflection of Malala Yousafzai and her fight for women’s education, and Saeed hopes that Amal Unbound and similar stories will inspire young girls all over the world to stand up for what is right.

What Amal Unbound gets wrong: Nothing, really. My only caveat is that this book is written for a younger audience than me, so there’s some repetition here and there. However, that’s not a reason to ignore this book! The story is compelling for both adults and children.

Who should read Amal Unbound: Middle-grade children, teens, and adults who want to learn about different cultures, customs, and global problems.

Who shouldn’t read Amal Unbound: Adults who prefer adult narratives.