Logos Links: April 2020

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Library team members Amber Wessies and Olivia Chin have searched the Internet for the best book, movie, and library-related links. Learn more about library news around the world below.

 

Virtual Activities With The Library Of Congress

Watch authors read their books and live drawing sessions with the Library Of Congress.

 

Bird Library Livestream

This library has a mini-library for birds!

 

How To Stop Saying “Um,” “Ah, and “You Know”

Filler words aren’t inherently bad, but using them can distract your audience. Learn how to “embrace the pause” and stop using filler words with this Harvard Business Review article.

 

We Are YA Podcast

This podcast checks in with different Young Adult (YA) authors each day to find out how they’re coping with the pandemic and to see what they are working on.

 

Where To Find Free Poetry Resources For Kids Online

A list of poetry resources for children, but adults may enjoy them, too!

 

Now and Next: What A Post-COVID World May Mean For Libraries

What will the world be like when COVID-19 pandemic has ended? What trends that occur now will continue in the future specifically for libraries? Libraries are in a unique place to support and encourage positive changes to our lives after we get back to “normal.” This article discusses 10 trends in the world today and the possible impact or changes for the future.

 

Help Out Libraries And Archives 

Many libraries and archives have online transcription projects that you can be a part of from home. You can transcribe everything from Rosa Parks’ writings to Abraham Lincoln’s letters and help out archivists across the world. This article describes how to get involved!

 

Digital Escape Rooms

Some examples of what libraries are doing digitally- one fun program is a digital Harry Potter-themed escape room!

 

Library-Themed Backgrounds For Your Next Video Call

Backgrounds from the New York Public Library to use with Zoom!

 

Virtual Book Clubs

This article gives directions and a link for checking which books can be read aloud without copyright infringement.

 

All Of A Sudden, I’m Working From Home- Now What Do I Do?

More tips for working from home!

 

Virtually Visit 8 World-Class Libraries

Virtual travel is all we have right now, and, if visiting libraries is your jam, there are several libraries that have online tours.

 

 

 

How To Find Books In The Library

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The library is not too difficult to navigate – after all, almost all of the books are on the 2nd floor! However, it can be confusing walking by the shelves and wondering where your particular book might be.

 

Here is a crash course in how to find a book in the library:

1. Look up the book on the library website using the search bar.

2. Locate the book in the search results. Check first to see if the book is Available. It will have a green check mark if it is Available and a red sign if it is Unavailable.

3. If your book is an ebook, click the link to access it online. If not, it will have a shelving location listed, like “Main Book Stacks” or “Main Reference.” Pay attention to the shelving location so that you go to the right area.

4. Locate the book’s call number. This is the specific order on the shelf where the book will be, in relation to all of the other books. An example is BS535 .L54 1987, which is the call number of The Literary Guide to the Bible.

 

*note: the call numbers are part of the Library of Congress system. View the basic graphic below for more info on that.*

 

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5. Once you have the call number, write it down (on your phone’s notes or on a piece of paper) and take it up to the 2nd floor with you. If your book is actually in the Juvenile section, then take the call number to the Family Room on the 1st floor.

6. Using the call number, find the shelf that your book is on. If your book is in the BS535 section, then find the shelves that say “BS530-BS536,” for example.

7. Once the shelf has been located, look on the shelf for your specific book. The other books will be in numerical order (i.e. BS535.6 will come before BS535.7). Look at the call numbers on their spines to find them.

8. Once you’ve found your book, you can take it down to the Circulation desk or use a self-check machine to check out.

 

If you’re having trouble finding a book in the library, don’t hesitate to ask for help! Sometimes a book may have been misplaced, or perhaps you didn’t see that it’s actually in the Reference section instead of the Main Book Stacks. We are happy to help you find what you need!

 

Matthew’s Monday Movie: “Jaws”

1975: it can be argued that this is the year that the first true “summer movie” was born, Jaws.  By the acclaimed Director Steven Spielberg, Jaws really cemented Spielberg as a first class director; this film would go on to become the highest grossing film up until Star Wars in 1977.

 Jaws taps into the most primitive and frightening aspects of survival: the fear of being hunted and of being prey. We humans are, no doubt, the top predators on land- our technology has made us so- however, in the deep depths of the ocean we are as out of our element as we are in space. This film represents the ultimate clash between man and beast. It’s a modern day Moby Dick.

This film stars Roy Scheider as Chief Martin Brody, a common man who finds himself in an ever escalating out-of-control situation. As a shark terrorizes the small touristy Island of Amity, it falls to Brody to come up with a plan to stop the ravenous monster. To do this, he enlists the help of Matt Hooper, a marine biologist played by Richard Dreyfuss. Hooper’s character is that of a logical man but sometimes over-confident in his abilities and technology to solve the problem.

The third member of the cast that sets out to eventually confront the shark is that of Captain Quint of the Orca, a shark fishing vessel. Quint is played by the famous English actor Robert Shaw. Quint’s character has a deep hatred of sharks and scoffs at others as they attempt to solve the problem. Eventually he offers his help in catching the mighty fish for ten thousand dollars.

One man who stands in sheer denial of the problems facing the island is Mayor Larry Vaughn, played by Murray Hamilton. Mayor Vaughn downplays the havoc the shark causes as freak accidents and is quick to believe that the problem has been dealt with when another larger shark is caught in its place. Vaughn cares only for the prospected tourism of the upcoming 4th of July and the money it will bring the Island.

The last main character of the film is that of the Great White shark itself. Originally a large mechanical shark was designed to be featured heavily in the film, but technical breakdowns made that impossible. Thus Spielberg was forced to take a minimalist approach to this horrific monster. This proved to be outstandingly successful idea, as the ominous and now famous score from the legendary John Williams brought the stalking beast to life. Many who have never seen the film know and recognize its theme “duunnn dunnn… duuuunnnn duun…” The audience soon learns that is the sound of impending doom.

Jaws is still recognized as the number one scariest movie of all time, since it had the very real effect of keeping people out of the water. It was immortalized in 2001 by the Library of Congress for preservation in the United States Film Registry because it was deemed “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.

Jaws is rated PG, but don’t let that fool you- it features some graphic scenes of violence including (“spoiler alert!”) shark attacks and some language.

It can be checked out at our library here.

 

*written by Matthew Beyer

Spotlight on the ProQuest Dissertation & Theses Database

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ProQuest Dissertation & Theses Global (PQDT Global) simplifies searching for dissertations and theses via a single access point to explore an extensive, trusted collection of 3.8 million graduate works, with 1.7 million in full text. Designated as an official offsite repository for the U.S. Library of Congress, PQDT Global offers comprehensive historic and ongoing coverage for North American works and significant and growing international coverage from a multiyear program of expanding partnerships with international universities and national associations. We offer effective and efficient results on our curated content platform with expert metadata that reduces noise in search results. Direct access to full text and other ProQuest and ebook subscriptions advance the research process.