Spotlight On “SciFinder-n”

scifinder

SciFinder-n is a science database that Union subscribes to. As Union students and employees, you can access SciFinder-n. When using SciFinder, you will need to create an account using your Union email and password. This account must be made using one of the Union Library’s computers. Once you have made your account, you can access the database from anywhere by using the link on the Databases, E-Books, and Media quick link from the library’s home page.

SciFinder-n is a great database for science students and professors, especially those in chemistry and pharmacy. Previously, Union only subscribed to SciFinder; now, we subscribe to SciFinder-n, which has some additional features and uses more up-to-date technology. Since you have an account, you can create email notifications when new results become available for your search terms. You can also save your search or specific results, so you don’t keep repeating the same search over and over.

In SciFinder-n, you can search using keywords, CAS numbers, and patent numbers. You can also create searches for substances and reactions or search suppliers and references. In SciFinder-n, you no longer need Flash in order to create substances when you use the draw search feature. Take some time to play around with the draw tool; it can be a challenge, but I felt accomplished when I got the structure drawn correctly. SciFinder-n offers tutorials for using the draw tool, if you need assistance. Research Coaches are also available to help you with using SciFinder-n and research in general.

One final highlight of SciFinder-n is the reaction feature, which shows you what reactions would look like as well as how to build certain compounds. SciFinder-n will provide information about suppliers and cost of supplies for making a compound. You can also find full patent information about the compound.

Spotlight On “The Chronicle Of Higher Education”

chronicle

The Chronicle of Higher Education is an online publication that carries articles about college enrollment, teaching tactics in large classrooms, salaries of tenured employees and university presidents, and other news related to higher ed. Many professors and education professionals use this newspaper to keep up with other colleges around the country. While you can see some of The Chronicle’s articles online for free, others require a subscription. That’s where the library comes in.

To access The Chronicle of Higher Education, or any other online magazine that we subscribe to:

  1. Go to the library website.
  2. Type in “The Chronicle of Higher Education” in the search bar.
  3. Click one of the links to view it online. Different databases, like Academic Search Complete, will provide access to The Chronicle of Higher Education.
  4. If you are off campus, you will be prompted to enter in your Union credentials. If there is trouble in accessing the link after that, then try a different link or email Stephen Mount at smount@uu.edu for help.

Spotlight On “Gale Virtual Reference Library”

gale

If you are not sure where to start your research or if you want some basic background information on your topic, you may want to try a reference resource. Reference resources include books like encyclopedias, dictionaries, thesauruses, and almanacs. When you can’t come into the library to use the print books, you can access a lot of this information online using the Gale Virtual Reference Library. If you need help finding background information, using Gale Virtual Reference Library, or even coming up with a topic, a Research Coach can help.

You can find a link to the Gale Virtual Reference Library on the Databases, E-books, and Media quick link on the library’s homepage. The databases are listed alphabetically, so scroll down until you see Gale Virtual Reference Library. This will give you the proper access as a Union student or employee (googling the database won’t do that).

Gale Virtual Reference Library has maps, encyclopedic entries of all types (cultural, historical, general, etc.), and dictionary entries. You can narrow your results by type of document, so if you only want maps, you can filter results for just maps. The type of document is also found underneath the results’ title in the search results list.

Another great feature of Gale databases is the reading level filter. Some Gale databases use a Lexile number where the higher the number, the higher the reading level. Others like Gale Virtual Reference Library use colored boxes with dots in them to show the reading levels. An orange box with five dots is geared for high school and above readers, while green with one dot is for early elementary readers. This can be a great way to filter results if you are wanting some simple background information or if you are looking for more technical information. You may also just filter for lower reading levels because you don’t want to go cross-eyed reading a college level text (we’ve all been there 😉). Don’t forget to schedule a Research Coach appointment if you want assistance with research or using Gale Virtual Reference Library; we are more than happy to help.

Spotlight On “The Atlantic”

the atlantic

The Atlantic is a popular online magazine that covers the latest news and cultural phenomenons around the world, with a particular focus on the U.S. Some articles of The Atlantic are not accessible to viewers who don’t have a subscription or who have used up their free articles for the month. However, the library provides Union students and employees with access to The Atlantic through the database Gale Popular Magazines.

To access The Atlantic:

  1. Go to the library website: www.uu.edu/library.
  2. Click on the “Databases, E-Books, & Media” link under Quick Links.
  3. Scroll down the alphabetical list until you find Popular Magazines. Click the link.
  4. Once you are in the Popular Magazines database, click “Publication Search” on the bottom right of the home page.
  5. Choose the option to “List All Publications.”
  6. Scroll down the alphabetical list until you see The Atlantic. Click that link, and then you will be able to see articles from The Atlantic by their publication dates.

Spotlight On “Film Criticism”

pex film crit

Film Criticism is the third oldest academic film journal in the United States and an open-access resource where you can download and print its various articles. Through Film Criticism, you can access full-text and peer-reviewed critiques of film experts about different movies, directors, and cinematic themes. Often the articles will also connect films to the real world, focusing on merchandising and cultural impact.

You can also read about TV shows in this journal, like Twin Peaks or Storage Wars. While Film Criticism is aiming at an academic audience, reading the reviews of the latest media could also help you find your next favorite show. If you’d like to be the one writing about entertainment, Film Criticism accepts submissions here.

Look for Film Criticism online or on the library website by searching the “Journals By Title or Subject” tab.