Reading List: Personal Finance

pex finance

How we budget, save, and invest our money is something that we all must examine in our lives. Thankfully, there are several resources available to help you get started on your journey with personal finance. This reading list includes both print books and eBooks that are all about saving for retirement, paying off student debt, calculating returns, and more!

 

*book descriptions provided by the publishers c/o the library catalog

 

You Can Do The Math: Overcome Your Math Phobia And Make Better Financial Decisions by Ronald Lipsman

In You Can Do the Math, Ron Lipsman draws from over 30 years of teaching mathematics to help you take control of your financial destiny by applying basic arithmetic techniques. Step by step, he walks you through the fundamental calculations that underlie virtually every financial decision.

 

The Personal Finance Calculator: How to Calculate the Most Important Financial Decisions in Your Life by Esme Faeber (eBook)

Is it better to buy or lease a car? How does one calculate an investment return? For that matter, what exactly is an investment return? The Personal Finance Calculator provides non-complex tools and calculations for assessing current personal wealth, determining how much debt is too much debt, understanding credit card interest rates, and more.

 

How To Make Your Money Last: The Indispensable Retirement Guide by Jane Bryant Quinn

With How to Make Your Money Last, you will learn how to turn your retirement savings into a steady paycheck that will last for life. Today, people worry that they’re going to run out of money in their older age. That won’t happen if you use a few tricks for squeezing higher payments from your assets- from your Social Security account (find the hidden values there), pension (monthly income or lump sum?), home equity (sell and invest the proceeds or take a reverse mortgage?), savings (should you buy a lifetime annuity?), and retirement accounts (how to invest and- critically- how much to withdraw from your savings each year?). The right moves will not only raise the amount you have to spend, they’ll stretch out your money over many more years.

 

No-Nonsense Finance by Errold F. Moody (eBook)

A straight-talking, real-life guide to all the aspects of personal financial planning by acclaimed web author E.F. Moody.

 

Student Debt: Rhetoric and Realities of Higher Education Financing by Sandy Baum

This book analyzes reliable evidence to tell the true story of student debt in America. One of the nation’s foremost experts on college finance, Sandy Baum exposes how misleading the widely accepted narrative on student debt is. Baum combines data, research, and analysis to show how the current discourse obscures serious problems, risks misdirecting taxpayer dollars, and could deprive too many Americans of the educational opportunities they deserve. This book and its policy recommendations provide the basis for a new and more constructive national agenda to make paying for college more manageable.

 

Taxes in America: What Everyone Needs to Know by Leonard Burman & Joel Slemrod

Most contemporary Americans know little about how their tax system works. But with heated debates over taxation now roiling Congress and the nation, an understanding of our tax system is of vital importance. In this book the authors, both tax scholars, offer explanations of how our tax system works, how it affects people and businesses, and how it might be improved. Organized in a question-and-answer format, the book describes the intricacies of the modern tax system.

 

501 Ways for Adult Students to Pay for College: Going Back to School Without Going Broke by Gen & Kelly Tanabe (eBook)

Adults can find the means to go back to school despite the pressures of work, family, and a mortgage with this guide to funding continued education. With expanded information on online and distance learning and part-time classes and new financial aid, loan, and scholarship opportunities, this updated resource teaches adult students how to find and win scholarships designed especially for them, obtain financial support from employers, get financial aid for distance learning, receive larger financial aid packages, take advantage of educational tax breaks, and trade tuition costs for volunteer service.

 

How to Have a Big Wedding on a Small Budget: Cut Your Wedding Costs in Half by Diane Warner

Provides advice on planning an economical wedding, including how to save money on wedding attire, flowers, food, and music, and offers sample budgets, current average costs, and histories of four weddings.

 

Budgeting Basics & Beyond by Jae K. Shim & Joel G. Siegel (eBook)

Financial and non-financial managers need to simplify their day-to-day work on important areas including budgeting, control, and planning, financial planning and modeling, project analysis, and capital budgeting. This updated desk reference gets to the core of every budgeting and planning issue fast.

 

The Theory of the Individual in Economics: Identity and Value by John Bryan Davis (eBook)

The concept of the individual and his/her motivations is a bedrock of philosophy. Economics, though, is guilty of taking this hugely important concept without questioning how we theorise it. This superb book remedies this oversight.

 

 

 

 

 

5 Financial Tips For College Students

pex finance

Recently, I have taken the Personal Financial Management class here at Union, and as I am about to graduate in the spring, I have begun to think more and more about more and more of my own finances. Here are 5 tips in personal finance:

1. Pay in cash.

If you can, try to pay for things up front and in cash. Whether it is a new phone or a new car, try to use cash. As college students, we probably already have thousands of dollars of debt anyways. We really don’t need more.

2. Pay off your student debt ASAP.

Becoming a college student is one of the best decisions you can make in your life. It can also be one of the most expensive. Once you graduate, it is important that you live meagerly and attempt to pay off your debt in a timely manner. The longer you wait, the more debt will accrue.

3. Save, save, save.

Once you start paying off your debts, you can start allocating your money to other things. One important tip I have learned is that you can just start saving the money that you were already using to pay off your debts. You already know how to live without that money, so maybe you can keep living that way.

4. Start investing early.

One of the classic and most important financial tips is investing early. Putting money into a 401K or mutual funds is critical. Money you invest now will grow exponentially, and being financially aware now can legitimately help you to become a millionaire by the time you retire.

5. Give to charity and to the Church.

This is something you should already be doing. God has told us that we should give a portion of our earnings to God. This is the most important tip I can give you. Give, not only because God will reward you, but because we are called to.

 

There are many other tips out there! Learning how to create a budget, creating an emergency fund, treating yourself every now and then, having small side jobs, and writing down your goals are just a few others. More than anything, the most important thing is to be responsible with the resources given to you!

 

*written by Donny Turner