Logos Links: June 2020

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Library team members Amber Wessies and Olivia Chin have searched the Internet for the best book, movie, and library-related links. Learn more about library news around the world below.

 

31 Children’s Books To Support Conversations On Race, Racism, and Resistance

A descriptive, helpful list of children’s books from Embrace Race.

 

Publishers Sue Internet Archive Over Free E-Books

With COVID-19, more free resources became available on the Internet. However, publishers are pushing back over what they consider to be piracy.

 

The 5 E’s Of Inquiry-Based Learning

Not sure how to engage students in scientific inquiry? Not a problem. The 5E Inquiry-Based Instructional Model can serve as your guide during the design and implementation of STEM instruction.

 

Anatomy of a Book

Old-fashioned words used to describe books, as provided by The New Yorker.

 

It’s Juneteenth!

Blog about miscellaneous African American art and poetry, as well as a celebration of Juneteenth.

 

The Ancient History of Board Games

What did game night look like thousands of years ago? Before Monopoly and Candy Crush, ancient people were playing mehen and the Game of Twenty Squares.

 

The State of Babies Yearbook

Need some statistics on babies and families in the U.S.? Check out the 2020 State of Babies Yearbook, where you will find changing demographics, health policies, and early learning recommendations.

 

NASA Names Headquarters After “Hidden Figure” Mary W. Jackson

If you enjoyed reading or watching Hidden Figures, you’ll be glad to know that the real-life Mary W. Jackson is being honored by NASA.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spotlight On “ProQuest U.S. Dailies”

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Newspapers in print are becoming a hard thing to find in some libraries.  However, some libraries, like the Union Library, have subscriptions to newspaper databases where users can access newspapers online rather than in print. ProQuest US Dailies is a database that contains a collection of national newspapers; it allows for library patrons to access and read newspaper articles published in major newspapers such as the Wall Street Journal and The New York Times, among others.

Users can search within ProQuest US Dailies by entering a topic or the title of a newspaper in the search bar.  If you want to browse the issues or find articles related to a topic, you have the option to do either. Users also have several options in narrowing down their search query; you can narrow down your search by document type (i.e. article, company profile, interview) as well as source type (i.e. article or audio-visual material).  Searching by language is also available, but you can only choose between English and Spanish.

With print newspapers becoming more rare, online access to major newspaper publications is a helpful thing for libraries to have. ProQuest U.S. Dailies is a helpful tool that patrons can easily access for either pleasure or research. Users can access this database from the list of Databases, E-books, and Media from the library’s home page.  For more information about finding newspapers in the library or online, click here.

Spotlight On “Gale Virtual Reference Library”

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If you are not sure where to start your research or if you want some basic background information on your topic, you may want to try a reference resource. Reference resources include books like encyclopedias, dictionaries, thesauruses, and almanacs. When you can’t come into the library to use the print books, you can access a lot of this information online using the Gale Virtual Reference Library. If you need help finding background information, using Gale Virtual Reference Library, or even coming up with a topic, a Research Coach can help.

You can find a link to the Gale Virtual Reference Library on the Databases, E-books, and Media quick link on the library’s homepage. The databases are listed alphabetically, so scroll down until you see Gale Virtual Reference Library. This will give you the proper access as a Union student or employee (googling the database won’t do that).

Gale Virtual Reference Library has maps, encyclopedic entries of all types (cultural, historical, general, etc.), and dictionary entries. You can narrow your results by type of document, so if you only want maps, you can filter results for just maps. The type of document is also found underneath the results’ title in the search results list.

Another great feature of Gale databases is the reading level filter. Some Gale databases use a Lexile number where the higher the number, the higher the reading level. Others like Gale Virtual Reference Library use colored boxes with dots in them to show the reading levels. An orange box with five dots is geared for high school and above readers, while green with one dot is for early elementary readers. This can be a great way to filter results if you are wanting some simple background information or if you are looking for more technical information. You may also just filter for lower reading levels because you don’t want to go cross-eyed reading a college level text (we’ve all been there 😉). Don’t forget to schedule a Research Coach appointment if you want assistance with research or using Gale Virtual Reference Library; we are more than happy to help.

Logos Links: May 2020

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Library team members Amber Wessies and Olivia Chin have searched the Internet for the best book, movie, and library-related links. Learn more about library news around the world below.

 

Now Is The Time For eBooks

While library buildings around the world are closed for COVID-19, and while patrons are staying at home, now is the perfect time to get started with eBooks.

 

Court Rules Detroit Students Have A Constitutional Right To An Education

This groundbreaking ruling decides that children have a right to literacy.

 

The Library Of Congress Wants To Help You Remix Public Domain Audio Clips

Have you ever wanted to be a DJ? Now there’s a free way to practice remixing, thanks to the Library Of Congress.

 

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month Book Recommendations

Celebrate Asian/Pacific American heritage with this book list compiled by the ALCS blog.

 

2020 Library Systems Report

Learn what’s new in the world of library technical services with this report by American Libraries Magazine.

 

Books With Memorable Moms

For Mother’s Day, this blog post names and celebrates some famous moms in literature.

 

Best Practices From World Libraries Photo Gallery

See what libraries are doing all around the world with this collection of photos and links.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spotlight On “ERIC”

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ERIC, Education Resource Information Center, is an educational database sponsored by the Institute of Education Services and free for anyone to use. ERIC is a go-to database for research related to education including almost 2 million records from the 1960s to the present. You will find reports and articles from non-profit organizations and government agencies, legislative hearings, and education journal articles and books. Please note: ERIC is for educational research, so you will not find lesson plans, textbooks, or book reviews. If you do need those things, check out some of our other databases, or reach out to a Research Coach for assistance.

As a Union employee or student, you can also search the ERIC database using the EBSCO interface. You may want to use the EBSCO version because the search features are similar to other databases you already use, such as Academic Search Complete or APA PsychInfo. The filters (like scholarly peer-reviewed, full text, date ranges, and language) will work in ERIC through EBSCO. However, the ERIC website is also user friendly and has some of the same filters like peer-reviewed and full text. These filters are found under the search bar.

You can access articles directly on the ERIC website. You can also find the link for ERIC on the Databases, E-Books, and Media quick link on the library homepage. The Database list includes access to ERIC and ERIC through EBSCO. Try both methods of access to decide which you prefer. If you access ERIC through EBSCO, you will be prompted to go to ERIC in order to download the full article (follow the prompts for finding full text).

Spotlight On “Westlaw Next”

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For students who need to find law, business, or news articles, Westlaw Next is a great database with which to start. The library provides access to Westlaw Next through our “Databases” link on the library website. Simply scroll down the alphabetical list of databases to find Westlaw Next, click on the link, and then you can begin searching within Westlaw Next.

What can you access through Westlaw Next? A few of its resources include court cases, state and federal law information, briefs, statutes and court rules, legislative history, and more. Westlaw Next also provides a “Campus Help Guide” pdf on its search page so that you can find help with navigating and searching the database.

For more help finding the databases and articles that you need, call the library at 731.661.5070, or come to our Circulation or Research Desks for in-person assistance.

 

 

Spotlight On “Gender Studies Collection”

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Gender Studies Collection, provided by Gale, is a database that the library subscribes to. Within the Gender Studies Collection, students can find articles on topics related to gender, family studies, health, feminism, and cultural norms. You can also limit your search to peer-reviewed, full-text articles to make your research easier.

Because Gender Studies Collection is also a Gale database, it has a “Topic Finder” that groups certain subjects together. You can use the Topic Finder to get started on your research and find articles and ideas that are similar to each other. Some of the topics include: Women’s Studies, Gender Equality, Sexuality, Female Identity Feminism, Nationalism, and more.

To access the Gender Studies Collection, or any other database, simply go to the library website. Click on the “Databases” quick link, then scroll down the list of databases until you find Gender Studies Collection. Accessing databases through the library website works much better than trying to Google them.

 

Spotlight On “The Biblical Archaeology Society Library”

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The Biblical Archaeology Society Library (BAS) is a database that our library subscribes to. Union students and employees can access this database by using the library website (click on the Databases quick link on the home page, and then scroll down the database list to find the BAS Library).

Through the BAS Library, students can explore special collections on King Herod the Great, Biblical Interpretation, Where Jesus Walked, The Birth of Jesus, Dead Sea Scrolls, and more. These special collections include videos, articles, and summaries of each topic. Three different publications are also available through the BAS Library: Biblical Archaeology Review, Bible Review, and Archaeology Odyssey. Readers will find helpful and accessible articles in each of these journals.

If you want to learn more about the Bible, Israeli history, and archaeology, visit the BAS Library.

Good Things To Do During COVID-19

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It’s currently a wild time in the world, to say the least. With COVID-19 ravaging our planet, staying at home and washing your hands has become first priority in our lives (read CDC guidelines here). Maybe you’re looking for something fun or helpful to do while we navigate uncertain territory? We’ve compiled a list of good things to do and use during this time:

 

Donate blood.

For Jackson residents, you can donate blood at Lifeline Blood Services at 183 Sterling Farm Drive.

 

Workout at home.

Campus Rec has been making creative at-home workout videos. Check them out on Instagram! You can also work on your yoga skills for free with Yoga With Adriene. And then, my personal favorite exercise: you can go for a run! It’s free and as long as you stay away from others, it’s safe to do so.

 

Put a dent in your reading list!

Staying at home = the perfect time to get reading! We have Reading Lists, Book Reviews, and eBook recommendations for you.

 

Take your children or younger siblings on a “bear hunt,” or put out a bear for children to view at your home or dorm.

Bear hunts have become a popular pastime for cooped-up kids, and they meet the requirement for social distancing.

 

Create side walk chalk art.

Chalk art is an easy way to brighten someone’s day without getting close to them!

 

Stream a free video with Films On Demand.

The library subscribes to an eVideo service called Films On Demand. Look it up on our website under the “Databases, E-Books, and Media” tab and watch something new!

 

Attend a virtual prayer group or church service.

Church teams have gotten extra creative during the pandemic with livestreams, apps, and video resources. If you haven’t found a local church yet, check out Union’s list of area churches.

 

Sew a face mask for a healthcare worker.

If you know how to sew, or if you’ve been wanting to learn, now is the time to get sewing! Here is a guide on how to sew a face mask.

 

Watch Sir Patrick Stewart read Shakespearean sonnets.

April is National Poetry month! What better time to listen to some classic poetry read by the Shakespearean actor Sir Patrick Stewart?

 

Use Zoom to schedule a Research Coach appointment or to connect with family/friends.

Zoom is a video conferencing tool that is essential for a time like this. Here’s how to schedule a Research Coach appointment with Zoom.

 

Take some time for self-care.

Check in on yourself and your friends. This is a difficult time for many in regards to mental health. Here are some self-care tips from Psychology Today. And here is a guide for diaphragmatic breathing, which can help with stress management.

 

Dive into spring cleaning.

When you’re stuck at home, it’s easy to find house-related projects to do. Maybe it’s time to clean out your closet or kitchen cabinets, or you can finally hang up those picture frames.

 

Watch “Some Good News With John Krasinski.”

Sometimes you just need to hear about the good things that are still happening in the world. Thankfully, beloved actor John Krasinski made a video to share good news on YouTube.

 

Find a new job.

Some places may need extra help during the pandemic. Check local listings to see where you can help out and get some extra cash!

 

Make a bucket list for when this is over.

Every time you think of something you want to do or go see, or a friend you miss, write it down on a piece of paper and put it into a jar. Then, when things are safe again, you can pull suggestions out of the jar and complete your bucket list!

 

Get into coloring.

Here is a website with free adult coloring pages!

 

 

What are your good ideas for spending your time during this pandemic? Let us know in the comments!

 

How To Set Up A Zoom Research Coach Appointment

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Have you ever needed help with research but can’t make it to the library? We’ve all been there, and now the library has a solution for you. Did you know that you can meet with a librarian for Research Coaching from the comfort of your room?

Meet with a Research Coach through Zoom video conferencing. Schedule an appointment today:

  1. When you schedule your Research Coach appointment (see directions for scheduling), choose the Video Conferencing (Zoom) option.
  2. Once you have scheduled an appointment, your coach will send you a confirmation email with your Zoom appointment link.
  3. A few minutes before your appointment time, open the Zoom link.
  4. Follow the prompts for downloading the Zoom application (you only need to do this once).
  5. You can choose to only use audio, but we recommend using video as well (we can see you, and you can see us).
  6. Your coach will start the Zoom conference; we will want to share our screen with you, or have you share yours with us. Your coach will walk you through this process during your meeting.

 

The Zoom conference is a great alternative if you can’t make it to the library. We can walk you through the research process and answer any of your questions. Zoom conferences allow you to see what we are doing live.

We recommend using a computer for Zoom conferences, although it is possible to use your mobile device. Get started today!