2018 In Review

2018

The library blog gained several new, dedicated writers in 2018. We wrote about everything from new books to wrestling and all that falls between. Let’s take a look back at the best of the blog from this year!

 

Amount of Blog Views: 2,055

Top 10 Posts Of 2018:

  1. Top 5 Underrated Library Perks
  2. Donny’s Deductions: The History of Professional Bowling
  3. How To Reserve A Study Room
  4. How To Use The Library As A Guest
  5. How To Print In The Library (For UU Students & Faculty/Staff)
  6. New In Our Archives: “The Private Papers of John Jeter Hurt”
  7. Myth-Shattering Fun Facts
  8. Top 5 Education Databases
  9. How To Download eBooks To Read Offline
  10. A Brief History of Union University

 

*these had the most views and interaction for this year

 

Top 10 Blog Post Quotes From 2018 (In No Particular Order):

1. Bowling two-handed makes it easier to hook the ball, thus scoring higher games with less experience. This makes the sport more accessible and many more middle and high school bowlers are using this technique. Jason Belmonte has helped grow the sport more than just about any other professional bowler. – Donny Turner, “Donny’s Deductions: The History of Professional Bowling”

 

2. A wrestling match can tell a story unlike any sporting event can, and sometimes it can do this better than television shows. A good wrestling match, if done well, can be up to half an hour long. This is longer than many TV shows and in that time, with few words and technically one scene, two wrestlers can tell a story unlike any other. – Brennan Kress, “Book Reviews: ‘Headlocks and Dropkicks’ by Ted Kluck”

 

3. 1975: it can be argued that this is the year that the first true “summer movie” was born, Jaws. – Matthew Beyer, “Matthew’s Monday Movie: ‘Jaws'”

 

4. Human beings pride themselves on their extensive and diverse knowledge of the world, but sometimes information gets confused along the way. Misunderstandings, urban legends, and flat out lies can infiltrate what we believe is common knowledge. – Ruth Duncan, “Myth-Shattering Fun Facts”

Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire.

5. Some afternoons you sit on the first floor of the library, bent over your Chemistry textbook, and hold up your eyelids because they stubbornly decide to close on you. “I can’t spend five dollars on a coffee this week. I’m broke!” you tell yourself. If you notice an acquaintance who’s in this situation, escort them into Modero and tell them to pick out a warm and caffeinated beverage – it’s on you. – Danielle Chalker, “Random Acts of Kindness Day”

 

6. Akage no An (Red Haired Anne) was introduced to Japan during the educational reforms of 1952. The series and its authorized prequel have both been adapted into anime, and two schools in Japan (the Anne Academy in Fukuoma and the School of Green Gables in Okayama) teach their students how to speak and behave as the admired character would. – Jordan Sellers, “Fun Facts You Might Not Know About Anne of Green Gables”

 

7. The older I’ve gotten, the more I’ve turned to nonfiction when I want to read something. Maybe I’m looking for advice, or maybe I just want to know how other people live, and think, and figure things out. To Shake the Sleeping Self is the perfect book to get inside someone else’s mind and feelings. Jenkins writes in a genuine, self-aware tone. He’s easy to relate to because he wonders about things we all do- who he is and who he will be in the future. – Olivia Chin, “Book Review: ‘To Shake the Sleeping Self'”

 

8. Are you an Anglophile? It’s okay, you can admit it. If you drink Earl Grey every morning, have the Union Jack hanging on your dorm room wall, or dream of going to grad school at Cambridge, you probably are. – Danielle Chalker, “Featured eBook: ‘The Cambridge Art Book'”

 

9. Reading can help increase empathy. By reading, especially fiction-reading, you increase your ability to empathize with others. If you can understand a character in a novel, you can better understand the people around you. – Brennan Kress, “On The Importance of Reading”

 

10. In the history of philosophy, it is important to learn about each philosopher’s predecessor, since many philosophers build off of what their mentor taught (or, interestingly, completely reject it). – Olivia Chin, “Featured Book: ‘A Short History of Modern Philosophy'”

 

Featured Writers:

Matthew Beyer

Danielle Chalker

Olivia Chin

Ruth Duncan

Brennan Kress

Jenny Manasco

Anna Poore

Jordan Sellers

Donny Turner

 

Featured eBook: “You Can Handle It: 10 Steps to Shift Stress From Problem to Possibility”

you can handle it

As the semester goes on, stress will inevitably continue to increase. Classes will get more difficult, nights will get longer, and sleep will be but a distant memory. In this time, it is important to be able to manage your stress in a healthy manner. You Can Handle It by Margaret Wehrenberg gives 10 steps on how to deal with an overabundance of stress.

  1. Breathe: She first talks about how just stopping to take a few deep breaths can help in almost any stressful situation. It is a great way to get your heart rate under control and calm down.
  2. Physically Relax: Being uptight and rigid while stressed can make the issue more prevalent. It can cause headaches, make your muscles sore, and, of course, give you more stress. Learning to physically relax will help ease tension and decrease stress.
  3. Be Assertive: Often times people who deal with a lot of stress also feel like they have to help other people with their problems. It is important to remember that your problems and the things you need to work on are just as important and need to take precedence.
  4. Manage Noise: Noise can be a huge stress inducer. Getting away from constant loud noises can be a great way to combat stress. Removing yourself from a noisy environment to a more peaceful one can be very helpful.
  5. Wait: Waiting can be boring. Waiting is too often seen as a monotonous activity that must be done with no real purpose; however, look at waiting as a positive opportunity. See it as a chance to escape from from the rush and business of life.
  6. Change Your Perspective: Monotony can cause stress. Dealing with the same things day in and day out can be exhausting and stressful. Changing your perspective of the every day things you deal with as new opportunities can help reduce stress.
  7. Eat!: In stressful periods of life, remembering to eat can be a chore, but not eating can be very bad for you and cause more unnecessary stress in your life. Always remember to eat some food throughout the day, even if it’s just an apple or a granola bar.
  8. Get Active: We have all heard that working out helps relieve stress, but staying active will also help you stay in control during stressful times. Physical fitness gives you the stamina you need to deal with stressful situations. Fitness also helps release built-up tension you may be dealing with.
  9. Achieve Inner Peace: Whether through religion or otherwise, finding ways to be content with yourself is vital. If you can’t be at peace with yourself and where you are in life, stress will follow you everywhere. A great way to be peaceful is to always be in the moment of where you are right now rather than worrying about things outside of your control.
  10. Play!: Taking a break from everything going on around you is vital to maintaining a healthy level of stress. Children get recess, but adults need it as well. Laughing and having fun outside of the things causing you stress will help you relax and recuperate.

 

With these tips, hopefully your stress levels will go down! Take some time to take care of yourself this semester.

 

* written by Donny Turner

 

Spotlight On The Testing & Education Reference Center Database

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The Testing & Education Reference Center has access to over 300 practice tests and courses for the GRE, GMAT, ACT, and more. Using this database, you can view resources for basic skills, high school level tests, undergraduate and graduate tests, and even career help.

For example, the TERC has a “Resume Writing” function, through a tool called “ResumeBuilder:”

Choose from more than 40 industries and select a resume design, and ResumeBuider will guide you through entering your information. You can access hundreds of brainstorming phrases, keywords, examples, and tips from the pros to help you along the way. When you’re done, you can save and print your final resume in Word, PDF, and more. You’ll also be able to email copies of your resume directly to potential employers and schools.

For international students, TERC has information on becoming a U.S. citizen and the TOEFL and TOEIC.

Regardless of what you’re studying for, it’s likely that the TERC database has access to prep guides and resource materials for you. Union students can access TERC through the library website- it’s listed under the Databases tab.

 

Spotlight on Test Prep and Research

gre-vs-gmat

Studying for a standardized test this summer? www.uu.edu/library contains tons of helpful information for test preparation. Below are several ways that the library can assist you.

  •  In order to access GRE, GMAT, NCLEX, and other prep materials, simply go the library’s website and click on the “Research” tab on the top left of the screen. Select “Test Prep” from the drop-down menu. The Test Prep page can lead you to countless online resources that include practice tests, practice questions, free websites, and more.
  • Tutorials, personally made by our library staff, can also be used to understand the resources available to you. For example, these RefWorks tutorials show how to navigate RefWorks and cite items through its system.
  • These Research Tips can guide you in finding peer-reviewed, reliable articles.
  • For extra help, use Ask-A-Librarian to receive answers to your questions about finding and using library materials.

 

 

Finals Week Survival Guide

pex finals

With finals week approaching, it’s easy to feel overwhelmed. Thankfully, the library is here for all of your studying and paper-writing needs. Here are a few tips on how to survive the infamous finals week:

1. Stake out your spot in the library. There are plenty of prime studying spots in The Logos; the key is finding the right one for your situation. For groups, reserving a study room ahead of time will be crucial. Maybe you need to get away from distractions; in that case, the Open Reading Room and the Open Printing area on the first floor are quiet areas. Whatever you may need, the library is fully equipped for your finals week survival.

2. Pet Buster. This is pretty obvious, but even just looking at Buster pictures will brighten your day. Think of the wonders cuddling him will do. Just be sure not to overwhelm him; he may be feeling the stress of finals week, too.

3. Remember to eat, and eat as healthily as you can. TIME magazine suggests eating foods that are digested slowly (whole grains, fresh vegetables, lean proteins) instead of just reaching for whatever is convenient. Be sure to eat a good breakfast as you start each morning, and drink water throughout your busy day to keep you hydrated.

4. Take a break. You can only absorb so much material at one time. Get up and walk around for a few minutes. Talk to a friend. Just be wary of getting away for too long.

5. Sleep. It can be tempting to pull an all-nighter, and sometimes you may have no other choice. However, if you can, at least take a nap. When your body is well taken care of, you will feel better and think more clearly for your finals.

Good luck to all of our students!